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Hello. I wrote two dialogues. Will you correct them?

No. 1

M: Do you have a copy of our auto insurance policy?

F: It should be in the car. Why?

M: You know the other day our car was damaged by the typhoon.

I'd like to check if the repair are [ repair is ] covered by the policy.

No. 2

M: How about [ How do you like / How's ] your new car?

F: As you know, nowadays [ these days ] cars are controled by computers.

I like the old cars I can fix by myself.

M: I know how you're feeling, but times have changed.

Thank you. kenta
Comments  
No. 1

M: Do you have a copy of our auto insurance policy?

F: It should be in the [remove double space] car. Why?

M: You know the other day our car was damaged by the typhoon.

I'd like to check if the repair is / repairs are covered by the policy.

No. 2

M: How about How do you like / How's your new car?

F: As you know, nowadays / these days cars are controlled by computers.

I like the old cars I can fix by myself.

M: I know how you feel, but times have changed. ["I know how you're feeling" is usually used about more personal/emotional matters.]
KentaNo. 1

M: Do you have a copy of our auto insurance policy?

F: It should be in the car. Why?

M: You know the other day our car was damaged by the typhoon. (comma after "You know,")

I'd like to check if the repair are [ repair is ] covered by the policy.
if the repair is / will be; if the repairs are / will be (all are common)

It's quite natural to use "to cover" in both senses here. (1) Will the company pay? (2) Does the policy includes coverage for the specified damage / repairs under the specified conditions / circumstances?

No. 2

M: How about [ How do you like / How's ] your new car?

F: As you know, nowadays [ these days ] cars are controled by computers. (double "l")

I like the old cars I can fix by myself.

M: I know how you're feeling, but times have changed.

(Correct, but "I know how you feel" is more common.)

"I know / understand how you're feeling" is more appropriate for feelings over a period of time.
"I know what you mean / I know how you feel" is more appropriate in response to an opinion in a discussion.

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Thank you, Mr Wordy. Your comment is very helpful!

kenta
AvangiYou know the other day our car was damaged by the typhoon. (comma after "You know,")

Actually, there are two slightly different meanings, one with a comma and one without. With the comma it means something like "Here's something you might be interested in..." Without the comma it means something like "You already know this, but...". The second meaning seems more likely to me here.
Mr Wordy[ The second meaning seems more likely to me here.
Hi, Mr. Wordy. I agree completely.
Somehow, I was thinking it needed a comma anyway.

I believe I was thinking that without a comma it would have an argumentative flavor, or one of insistance:
"What's the matter with you? You knowthe car was damaged by the typhoon! How can you suggest we not get it repaired?"Emotion: angry

Or something like that. Emotion: big smile

Best regards, - A.
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Thank you all. The difference between "you knou" and "you know," is instructive.

kenta