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Hello. I wrote two dialogues. Will you correct them?

No. 1

M: Let's meet [ see ] again this Wednesday, the day after tomorrow.

F: Oh? The day after tomorrow is Thursday.

M: Sorry, so it is. Yesterday, Monday, was substitution holiday,

so I thought it is [ was ] Monday today.

No. 2

M: My boss told me that we'll hire a new engineer in the near future.

F: I heard the same thing from my colleague. Who has decided it?

M: I don't know, but the rumor may be true, I think.

Thank you. kenta
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Hi,

No. 1

M: Let's meet [ see ] again this Wednesday, the day after tomorrow. Why would you say both? You'd probably say one or the other.

F: Oh? The day after tomorrow is Thursday.

M: Sorry, so it is. Yesterday, Monday, was a substitution holiday, What's a 'substitution holiday'?

so I thought it is was Monday today.

No. 2

M: My boss told me that we'll we're going to hire a new engineer in the near future.

F: I heard the same thing from my colleague. Who has decided it? that?

M: I don't know, but the rumor may be true, I think. It's not a rumour if your boss told you.

Best wishes, Clive
M: Let's meet [ see ] again this Wednesday, the day after tomorrow. "meet" is okay, "see" doesn't fit in this context. You could say "see each other" but it implies a degree of intimacy that may not alpply here.

F: Oh? The day after tomorrow is Thursday.

M: Sorry, so it is. Yesterday, Monday, was a substitution holiday, I don't know what you mean by "substitution holiday."

so I thought it is [ was ] Monday today. Your version is okay but "today was Monday" sounds more idiomatic.

M: My boss told me that we'll hire a new engineer in the near future.

F: I heard the same thing from my colleague. Who has decided it? This seems like a non sequitur . Who has decided what? Whether to hire someone? Who to hire? Something else? It's not clear.

M: I don't know, but the rumor may be true, I think.
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Thank you, Clive.

You don't use "substitution holiday"?

When I have to work on Sunday, I can take a day off on Monday to make up for it.

We call this "substitution holiday."

I guess you just say "holiday", right?

kenta
Thank you, RayH.

You wrote:

This seems like a non sequitur . Who has decided what? Whether to hire someone? Who to hire? Something else? It's not clear.

Really? Of course it means "who has decided to hire a new engineer in the near future".

Boss just told the decision. No one knows who decided it.

Isn't is clear?

kenta
Hi,

You don't use "substitution holiday"?



When I have to work on Sunday, I can take a day off on Monday to make up for it.



We call this "substitution holiday."



I guess you just say "holiday", right?

In N. America, in my experience, a 'holiday' is a day when (almost) no-one works, eg Christmas Day, Thanksgiving. Days when I, personally, don't have to work, although other people do, are commonly referred to as 'a day off'.

If I work on Sunday and consequently am allowed not to work on Monday, I'd call it 'a day off in lieu of having worked on Sunday'. The actual slang term used is 'a lieu day', (pronounced 'a loo day'.) This is my workplace experience. It's possible other regions may use different terms for this.

'Lieu days' can sometimes be saved up by the employee until some later time.

Best wishes, Clive

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveI'd call it 'a day off in lieu of having worked on Sunday'. The actual slang term used is 'a lieu day', (pronounced 'a loo day'.)
Interesting. I've never heard the term "lieu day." The term I've always heard and used is "comp day" meaning "compensatory day." In some businesses the term "comp time" is also used in cases where employees are allowed to take time off instead of getting overtime pay. As you might imagine it is an easily abused practice (in that the overtime gets worked but the "comp time" never seems to arrive).
I have a big dictionary for Japanese learners which has more than 1 million words and expressions.

It doesn't have "lieu day", but it has "comp day."

Just for information. Thank you!

kenta