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Our professor said this in our class today. He said, “by today, you would’ve finished the first and the second assignment.”

Why did he use ‘would’ve’? He could have said, you probably have finished the first and second assignment. I am confused. Please help.

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anonymous

Our professor said this in our class today. He said, “by today, you would’ve finished the first and the second assignment.”

Why did he use ‘would’ve’? He could have said, you probably have finished the first and second assignment. I am confused. Please help.

Why did he use that word? I think you need to ask him. Here on the forum we can only guess.

Rather than speculate on your professor's word choice, let me just say that I would expect "will have" rather than "would have (would've)" because it's about today, not about a time in the past. The meaning is as you suggest: By today you have probably finished ....

CJ

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CalifJim
anonymous

Our professor said this in our class today. He said, “by today, you would’ve finished the first and the second assignment.”

Why did he use ‘would’ve’? He could have said, you probably have finished the first and second assignment. I am confused. Please help.

Why did he use that word? I think you need to ask him. Here on the forum we can only guess.

Rather than speculate on your professor's word choice, let me just say that I would expect "will have" rather than "would have (would've)" because it's about today, not about a time in the past. The meaning is as you suggest: By today you have probably finished ....

CJ

Thank you for your response. So when he said ‘by today’, he meant by this time right now. The time that he said the sentence. He was expecting us to get those first and second assignments done by the time when he said the sentence. With this context, what was the use of would have in his sentence?

anonymous
CalifJim
anonymous

Our professor said this in our class today. He said, “by today, you would’ve finished the first and the second assignment.”

Why did he use ‘would’ve’? He could have said, you probably have finished the first and second assignment. I am confused. Please help.

Why did he use that word? I think you need to ask him. Here on the forum we can only guess.

Rather than speculate on your professor's word choice, let me just say that I would expect "will have" rather than "would have (would've)" because it's about today, not about a time in the past. The meaning is as you suggest: By today you have probably finished ....

CJ

Thank you for your response. So when he said ‘by today’, he meant by this time right now. The time that he said the sentence. He was expecting us to get those first and second assignments done by the time when he said the sentence. With this context, what was the use of would have in his sentence?

Also, our professor is very polite and little shy. He probably used would’ve to show politeness. Is that possible?

anonymousHe probably used would’ve to show politeness. Is that possible?

Yes. That could be the reason.

CJ

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CalifJim
anonymousHe probably used would’ve to show politeness. Is that possible?

Yes. That could be the reason.

CJ

You mean the use of would’ve in the sentence is appropriate and correct with that meaning?

anonymousYou mean the use of would’ve in the sentence is appropriate and correct with that meaning?

As I said, "wouldn't" is unexpected in that context, so it doesn't sound quite right to my ear regardless of why the word was chosen by the speaker.

Have you considered the possibility that your professor just misspoke? It's surprising how often we intend to say one word and another word pops out.

Native speakers would just pass over such a thing barely noticing it. It's not necessary to analyze every word under a microscope.

CJ