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Dear teachers,

In the following sentence, I think the third conditional is used.

If I would have known about the team tryouts, I would have signed up for them.

Why, then, the "would have" construction is used in the if-clause? I was taught that the Past Perfect shall be used in the if-clause, not the "would have" structure.

Can you explain this, please?

Thanks.
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As far as I know you are right --- it should be "If I had known ..., I would have ...". The if-clause refers to something that happened before the then-clause, hence the past perfect.
Thank you Ferdis.

But, that sentence was part of a GMAT test and the correct option is the one that is underlined. I chose the "had done" structure but was incorrect. I want to know why. I know about Mixed-conditionals and Special conditionals, but never run through this odd usage of conditionals.

Can anyone help me understand what the rule (or exception to the rule) is?
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"If I would have known ..." sounds plain wrong to me. I'm a British English speaker, and I'm not sure about American English usage here, but I'm guessing that in all forms of English this is inferior to "If I had known...".
renan torres-riveroWhy, then, is the "would have" construction is used in the if-clause?
Think of it as a mistake. Native speakers often make that mistake. Don't worry about it. Accept it as a substitute for had known when you hear it, but use had knownyourself. Emotion: smile

CJ
renan torres-riveroBut, that sentence was part of a GMAT test and the correct option is the one that is underlined. I chose the "had done" structure but was incorrect.
Perhaps it would be helpful to write what the other options were.
Sometimes even the best books can make a mistake. Emotion: wink
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Ok, Tanit. These are the options from the GMAT test:

17. If I would have known about the team tryouts, I would have signed up for them.

A. would have known
B. would had known
C. could of known
D. had been told
E. could have been told

I chose "D". It was wrong. They said "A" was the correct answer.

Which would you choose? and why?

Cheers!
According to me that's a clear "D". A-C are all grammatically wrong, while E is possible but very far-fetched; it implies it was not possible to tell him -- perhaps because he was deaf at the time -- but if it had been possible he would have signed up, regardless of the actual telling. It could have a sarcastic meaning.
renan torres-riveroI chose "D". It was wrong. They said "A" was the correct answer.

I agree with Ferdis. The correct answer is D.
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