+0
I would like to know the difference between "would have p.p. " and " could have p.p." when I want to mention something that has a possibility to have happened in the past.

For example,

It was cold last night and he is coughing now.
Usually he is very healty and never seems to catch a cold.
But,
1)He would have caught a cold last night.
2)He could have caught a cold last night.

I think I can use "may/might have p.p." with the same meaning as the sentences above except for the differences of the degree of possibilities.
Is my understanding correct??

Thank you in advance!
Comments  
H MHe would have caught a cold last night.
This has an implied conditional (e.g., … if he hadn’t dressed properly), which is not what you mean.

You can use could/may/might have interchangeably for the meaning you intend.
H MI would like to know the difference between "would have p.p. " and " could have p.p." when I want to mention something that has a possibility to have happened in the past.
Note also that in some situations "would have p.p." can express the speaker's belief or assumption that something did happen. For example: "He's very security-conscious; he would have made sure the door was locked." This meaning seems unlikely in your "caught a cold" example, though.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks a lot for your explanation!

Now I'm wondering, can "would have p.p." be used only as a conditional?
You can never use to mention the possibility in the past?
I mean, to guess something that might have happened.
H MYou can never use it to mention the possibility in the past?
I mean, to guess something that might have happened.
Never.
Thanks a lot! :-)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I got it!
I seemed to be confused with the speaker's belief or assumption and the possibility in the past.

I really appreciate your help!
Now I feel very good :-)