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If summer didn't heat it enough, then it would not melt, and next winter would add to it, and the winter after that, and on and on, until global warming would come to seem like the memory of a lunatic, and another ice age would have begun.

I need help with the usage of <would have pp>. I can't understand why the writher used <would have begun> instead of just <would begin>. Please help~
Comments  
The sentence is sloppy. I think the writer is wrong in the use of the until-clause. I'd like to correct it like below.

If summer didn't heat it (ice cap?) enough, then it would not melt (much), and next winter would add (some ice) to it, and the winter after that, and (the same would continue) on and on until global warming had come to seem like the memory of a lunatic and another ice age had begun.

paco
Paco, thanks for your answer. However, the author is a native American. Could there be any other way that could explain why the author used future perfect in this sentence?
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Hello

An 'until'-clause is an adverbial so that it needs not to be in future even when the main clause is in future. Let me make a sentence below (please note the perfective aspect fits best to the statement in 'until'-clauses).
(1) Children will not sleep until father has come back home.
'Pastize' this sentence by changing "will" to "would", then we get:
(2) Children would not sleep until father had come back home.

In your sentence, the 'until'-clause is embedded in the result clause of a second counter-factual conditional sentence. I have a feeling that many of native speakers have not been well taught in school how to choose correctly the tense of sub-clauses embedded in this kind of hypothetical statements.

paco
I looked up some sentences with "until" and now I know what you're expaining to me. Thank you so much, Paco.
Hello,

I can't agree with Paco that the sentence is <sloppy>. The sentence is well constructed and, in my view, has a flowing lyrical quality. As regards the phrase <would have begun>, this means that the beginning of the ice age was earlier, i.e. probably when the snowman, I thought, or ice cap, first did not completely melt. If the phrase <would begin> is used then this would suggest the ice age is beginning at the latest time referred to in the sentence or even some time later.

I hope this makes it a bit clearer.

Cheers

Tim Lynch, in a cold Manchester
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Bamtori
If summer didn't heat it enough, then it would not melt, and next winter would add to it, and the winter after that, and on and on, until global warming would come to seem like the memory of a lunatic, and another ice age would have begun.

I need help with the usage of <would have pp>. I can't understand why the writher used <would have begun> instead of just <would begin>. Please help~

Future use:

"would have begun" = Looking to a point in the future and then looking back on what has already begun. i.e. before that future moment.

Now --->--->--action began<----<<<---.future moment

"would begin" = Looking to a point in the future when something begins/will begin, i.e. at that future moment.

Now --->--->---->---->----> future moment/action begins
Hello everybody, Could someone please help me to know if the following sentence is gramatically correct.

"I expect to have reached the following goal by the end of the next year: I would have finished my study successfully"

Is the use of "would have finished" is correct in the above sentence. I mean is it possible to use "would have PP" instead of for example "will have PP" to imagine a possible situation in the future? Thank you in advance for your kindly help.