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Hey,

What should I say when one is asking "Would you mind to open the window" and I wouldn´t like to open it. So should I say "No I wouldn´t" or "Yes I would" to tell to one that I don´t like to do it.

The word "mind" is translated as "uncomfortable", so "Would you mind to open the window" should be same as "Are you uncomfortable if you opened the window".

Thanks for the help.
Comments  
wessmanWould you mind to open the window
This is not correct. The question is

Would you mind opening the window?

If you are willing to open the window, say, "Not at all" and open the window.

If you are not willing to open the window, say, "I'd rather not" and be prepared to say why.

wessmanThe word "mind" is translated as "uncomfortable"
This is not correct. In this context mind means object to (~ protest). Would you object to opening the window?

CJ
Technically the answer that would indicate you do not want to open the window would be, "Yes, I would mind." However, there are many who would not like this answer and some who might even consider it rude and get offended. I suggest, instead, answering with something like, "I am sorry, but I would rather not." This way you are politely turning down their request.

I hope this helps.

-S
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Hi,

What should I say when one is asking "Would you mind to open the window" and I wouldn´t like to open it. So should I say "No I wouldn´t" or "Yes I would" to tell to one that I don´t like to do it.

The word "mind" is translated as "uncomfortable", The idea of 'would you mind?' is more like 'would you object?'

Iso "Would you mind to open the window" should be same as "Are you uncomfortable if you opened the window".

The correct way to ask is Would you mind opening the window, please?

If you don't want to. then answer Yes., I would. This is short for Yes, I would mind.

Clive
I'll attempt to make it as simple as I can.

Take this dialogue as an example:

Rowan: "Would you take my book to your house?"

Eric: "Yes, I would."

Why did Eric say "would"? Because Rowan used a verb in his question.

Thus, your question should be: "Is the word 'mind' a verb?", and the answer would be: yes, it is.

The same happens with your example:

Shawn: "Would you mind to open the window"?

Rachel: "Yes, I would (in other words, rudely say she wouln't open it)".

I agree, however, it sounds cynical.

It isn't pleasant to hear somebody says to you that sentence. You could probably be insulted.

You could say instead: "I can't open it at the moment" or "Could I open the window later?".

Yet, I think it is correct to say this.
Many thanks to everyone for their replies.

As "Yes, I would" is concidered rude, how about "No, I wouldn´t" if I liked to open the window? This question is just for a technical purpose.

And still about the writing of the "Would you mind to open the window" sentence, is it definitely incorrect and no native English speaker would ever say so? I speak not grammartically correct my own language, instead, I speak it in the way we are used to (sometimes is as the rule says, sometimes it´s not). So how about in this case, really? I little bit doubt that all native English speakers speak English as the rule says ;-) . Don´t take me wrong, I don´t mean to encourage people to speak it incorrectly.....

Thanks again for your great help.

BR: PW
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If you want to open it, then the answer would usually be something like "No, I don't mind at all." This would not be considered rude in any way- it would be a common answer to such a question.

As to your other question, the way you had this sentence worded originally is definitely incorrect and no native English speaker that I know of would word it this way. That is not to say that all native speakers necessarily use correct English, but the particular way you had the sentence worded is not a common mistake for a native speaker, though the average native speaker would still be able to tell what you intended to say.

Take care.

-S
Lesson learned :-) and many thanks to everyone who kindly and patiently helped me. BTW, this forum is GREAT with GREAT PEOPLE! Have a wonderful weekend.

BR: PW
wessmanAnd still about the writing of the "Would you mind to open the window" sentence, is it definitely incorrect and no native English speaker would ever say so?
This is such an important point that I want to repeat what sbolton has already said about it. Like the speakers of any language, English speakers don't always speak exactly as the grammar books advise. Nevertheless, there are very specific areas within the grammar of English where deviations from the standard forms occur for certain populations of native speakers. These problem areas for native speakers show almost no overlap with the problem areas that occur for non-native learners of English.

The grammar of the verb "mind" is not among the places in English where such deviations occur for native speakers. It's mind + an -ing word for everyone. (mind going, mind taking, mind looking, ...) The confusion of the "to + verb" form with the "verb + ing" form is almost exclusively a non-native problem.

CJ
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