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Hello,

I'm not sure whether I should use will or would here. Can you please help me?

The two actors worked on staging their theatrical version of the horrible experience (that) political prisoners in Z went through in the early Fifties on the island of XY. Nobody knew or could have imagined that would be their last cooperation and that the two founders of the theatre company will/would never again have the possibility to question and fulfill their theatrical dreams and ideas.

(the second actor died soon after the show)

My second question is why there is a capital letter in Fifties, and my third question is should I omit that or not?

Thank you
Comments  
I would choose "WOULD" because we are using the past tense all the time. We are looking at the action from a past perspective. Therefore, they "would never again have the possibility..."

You CAN omit "that".

I suppose "Fifties" is written in capital letters because it is referring to a famous period of time.

Eire.
Dear Antonia,

«

The two actors worked on staging their theatrical version of the horrible experiences that political prisoners in Z had endured on the island of XY in the early 1950s. Nobody knew or could have imagined that this would be their last collaboration and that the two founders of the theatre company would never again be able to explore and realise their theatrical dreams and ideas together.

»

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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Thank you both very much for your effort and time.

Why do you prefer collaboration to cooperation? Is to question and fulfill a dream wrong?
I think you usually make a dream come true.
I think fulfill is also OK, but perhaps it doesn't fit into teh context. Thanks PieanneEmotion: smile
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Hello Antonia

I don't see Goldmund online, so I'll see if I can answer instead.

'Collaboration' would be the usual term, where two people work together on an 'artistic' project.

'To fulfil a dream' has a slightly starry-eyed, clasped-hands quality; our two chaps require something a little more formal and important-sounding.

MrP