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Hi,

Joe: Do you think John Doe who is going to be on our next show will tell what is in his mind?

Sue's possible responses:
1) I don't think he would be willing to tell what is in his mind if we asked him to. -- Correct. I think.
2) I don't think he would tell what is in his mind. -- Grammatically wrong, I think.
3) I don't think he will tell what is in his mind. -- Correct, I think, but is there any wayone can convey a sense of not-so-definiteness? The modal 'would' be incorrect to reference the future, then what can one use?
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All the replies are ok.
But I think you mean the idiom "on his mind" - Do you think he would tell us what is on his mind? (Do you think he will be honest with us?)
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Thank you, but with all due respect, this is what I think: I looked the sentences over and found that some might be wrong. Yes, I think I should have used "on his mind".

Additional comments made by me on my sentences:
Sue's possible responses:
1) I don't think he would be willing to tell what is (I think this should be 'was') in his mind if we asked him to. -- Correct. I think.
2) I don't think he would tell what is in his mind. -- Grammatically wrong, I think. -- I still think this is not correct to say what he will do in the future.
3) I don't think he will tell what is in his mind. -- Correct, I think, but is there any wayone can convey a sense of not-so-definiteness? The modal 'would' be incorrect to reference the future, then what can one use?
1) I don't think he would be willing to tell what is (I think this should be 'was') in his mind if we asked him to. -- Correct. I think.
Yes, but the meanings are different:
I don't think he would be willing to tell what is on his mind if we asked him to -This means in the present time or at some future time when you asked, you think he would not be willing to tell you what is (currently) on his mind.
I don't think he would be willing to tell what was on his mind if we asked him to - This means in the present time or at some future time, when you asked, you think he would not be willing to tell you what he was thinking about at some time in the past.

2) I don't think he would tell what is on his mind. -- This is grammatically correct. I am a native-born American English speaker, and often use "would" in expressions like this.

3) I don't think he will tell what is on his mind. --This is correct, too.
The modal 'would' be incorrect to reference the future, then what can one use? The modal "would" can be used, as well as "might" or "might not."
I think he might tell (us) what is on his mind.
I think he might not tell (us) what is on his mind.