+0
'But if you didn't know any Russian why did you offer to give him Russian lessons?
Because I knew that he would refuse/would have refused.He always rejected my offers.'

Is there any difference in the meaning of the sentence if I choose would refuse rather than would have refused?
At first I would opt for I would have refused but after pondering a while I've come to the conclusion that even would refuse could go.
But I can't really figure out the different shades of meaning underlying the choice.

Anyone can help?

Thanks in advance
+0
I would vote for "would have refused". Everything sets in the past so no need to shift to the present. For more detailed information, search "would/would have" on the search box right above.
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
DollI would vote for "would have refused". Everything sets in the past so no need to shift to the present. For more detailed information, search "would/would have" on the search box right above.
Is not as simple as saying that everything is set in the past.By the way would refuse refers to a "future in past" situation and not to the present.

Using would have refused implies that you are making an assumption about a hypothetical situation which didn't take place.

I guess that would refuse is the right choice in this contex since it refers to a real situation that took place (I offered him some English lessons which he refused)
Hmm, obviously you know the answer so what is the point in asking it again? Emotion: smile

"Is not as simple as saying that everything is set in the past."

What can I do? I am a simple girl and give simple answers. Don't forget to search "politeness expressions" too.