One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Directed by Milos Forman

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a novel written by American Ken Kesey and first published in 1962. In 1975, Czech Milos Forman directed the successful movie after a first attempt by Dale Wasserman of adapting the novel into a two-act play, one year before. Despite the unconventional and countercultural themes, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest had a popular and great success! The film has recently been named one of the greatest movies by the American Film Institute and is the only one having won the top five categories at the Oscars: Best Movie, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Direction and Best Picture.

The title of the novel has a symbolic meaning: “cuckoo” not only represents a bird, but is also used in a more colloquial language to talk about fouls and silly people. The cuckoo bird nests into other birds’ nests but his own one and as a consequence its chicks are risen up by other birds. The nest is an allegory of the mental hospital where the story takes place and its guests might be compared to the little chicks growing there. The guests are taken under a straight discipline that shows more than once a sort of sadic vein.

The story is about an outrageous convict, Randall Patrick Mc Murphy played by an amazing Jack Nicholson, who had decided to have himself declared insane in order to expire the rest of his prison term in comfort and luxury in a mental hospital. Mc Murphy thinks been on an easy street, but what he doesn’t know is that been transferred to the mental hospital would mean lying in “the cuckoo’s nest” until an advisory board of his mental sanity would be released. This will never happen!

Mental asylum’s rules are tight and Mc Murphy challenges them from the time he arrives in the institute by upsetting the fake democratic schedule of the group therapy and by brushing his teeth before the settled time.

Everything in his personality suggests great energy and lack of control: he’s exuberant, vital and vulgar, but perfectly self-conscious and sane.

The authority and maternal figure in the clinic is clearly Nurse Ratched, also known as Big Nurse in the book, a woman whose characteristics seem barely human. She operates a punishment-reward system to slow the independence of her patients. Nurse Ratched’s intention is that one of pushing the patients against one another so that they remain submitted to her influence without realizing so.

Mc Murphy is the only one to resist Nurse Ratched’s control: he is the antithesis of what the woman represents: bureaucracy vs. vitality. Mc Murphy and Nurse Ratched start playing some sort of power-game to gain the consent of the inmates who mainly are acutes, meaning they can be realised by their own will, whenever they want.

But the real question is: how sane the characters involved in the story are? Is there a chance for the patients to get worst because of them staying in hospital? Are the patients the real fouls?

The mental institution is meant to repair damage done by religious believes, schools and families, but it actually operates the same way as these organizations and still causes the same problems.

The point is being able to understand what madness is considered to be by the “sane community”.

The movie gives an answer to this: normality is relative and madness affects anyone not respecting society’s rules. That’s why Mc Murphy not only fights against his antagonist, but he also struggles against conformism. He wants to create a real relationship with his inmates and this underlines the coldness of the whole medical staff.

Mc Murphy manages to flee from the clinic for one day only together with all his inmates. They organise a trip on a boat: the scene puts upside down the “fouls’ ship” topos, this experience helps the mental hospital’s guests to taste the pleasure of life again. The “fouls’ ship” topos was born in 15th and 16th century: it was common to turn away through northern rivers a ship filled in with fouls in order to cast them away from society. In fact madness was considered sinful, summarizing all vices and in some way it was a kind of acknowledgement of the sane world’s hipocrisy.

Once Mc Murphy comes back to the clinic, is officially declared socially dangerous thus, the mental hospital becomes both a second prison and a grave.

The novelist Kesey wrote this story after having worked inside a mental asylum as an operator.

The film actually is not that trusty to the book: Kesey’s novel is narrated in first person narration by Chief Bromden, a native American who was though to be deaf and dumb by all the clinic’s medical staff. This character plays a very important role, but as a result of his hallucinations the reader can’t fully trust his words in the novel. The movie is much less introspective and focuses mostly on the conflict between Mc Murphy and Nurse Ratched.

The book was written in the late 50s when the United States were engaged in the Cold War with Soviet Union; in this period a great number of young people begun questioning themselves about the values of power. Chief Bromden character takes this point through and shows how the collectivity tries to overwhelm people like Mc Murphy.

The film has been criticized because of its fake portrais of mental hospitals and Kesey himself disliked the movie and most of all the casting of Jack Nicholson as Mc Murphy.

--------------------

I took the sourses here and there form the net.

Thank you in advance for your help!!
Some problems with grammar. Spelling and wording problems throughout.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Directed by Milos Forman

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a novel written by American Ken Kesey and first published in 1962. In 1975, Czech Milos Forman directed the successful movie after a first attempt by Dale Wasserman of adapting the novel into a two-act play, one year before. Despite the unconventional and countercultural themes, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest had a popular and great success! The film has recently been named one of the greatest movies by the American Film Institute and is the only one having won the top five categories at the Oscars: Best Movie, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Direction and Best Picture.

The title of the novel has a symbolic meaning: “cuckoo” not only represents a bird, but is also used in a more colloquial language to talk about fouls and silly people. The cuckoo bird nests into other birds’ nests but his own one (don't understand this) and as a consequence its chicks are raised (?) by other birds. The nest is an allegory of the mental hospital where the story takes place and its guests might be compared to the little chicks growing there. The guests are taken under a straight discipline that shows more than once a sort of sadic (don't know this word) vein.

The story is about an outrageous convict, Randall Patrick Mc Murphy, played by the amazing Jack Nicholson, who had decided to have himself declared insane in order to expire the rest of his prison term in comfort and luxury in a mental hospital. Mc Murphy thinks been on an easy street, but what he doesn’t know is that been transferred to the mental hospital would mean lying in “the cuckoo’s nest” until an advisory board of his mental sanity would be released. This will never happen! (Tense inconsistency throughout)

Mental asylum’s rules are tight and Mc Murphy challenges them from the time he arrives in the institute by upsetting the fake democratic schedule of the group therapy and by brushing his teeth before the settled time.

Everything in his personality suggests great energy and lack of control: he’s exuberant, vital and vulgar, but perfectly self-conscious and sane.

The authority and maternal figure in the clinic is clearly Nurse Ratched, also known as Big Nurse in the book, a woman whose characteristics seem barely human. She operates a punishment-reward system to slow the independence of her patients. Nurse Ratched’s intention is that one of pitting the patients against one another so that they remain submitted to her influence without realizing so.

Mc Murphy is the only one to resist Nurse Ratched’s control: he is the antithesis of what the woman represents: bureaucracy vs. vitality. Mc Murphy and Nurse Ratched start playing some sort of power-game to gain the consent of the inmates who mainly are acutes, meaning they can be realised by their own will, whenever they want to do so.

But the real question is: how sane are the characters involved in the story? Is there a chance for the patients to get worst because of them staying in hospital? Are the patients the real fouls?

The mental institution is meant to repair damage done by religious believes, schools and families, but it actually operates the same way as these organizations and still causes the same problems.

The point is being able to understand what madness is considered to be by the “sane community”.

The movie gives an answer to this: normality is relative and madness affects anyone not respecting society’s rules. That’s why Mc Murphy not only fights against his antagonist, but he also struggles against conformism. He wants to create a real relationship with his inmates and this underlines the coldness of the whole medical staff.

Mc Murphy manages to flee from the clinic for one day only together with all his inmates. They organise a trip on a boat: the scene puts upside down the “fouls’ ship” topos, this experience helps the mental hospital’s guests to taste the pleasure of life again. The “fouls’ ship” topos was born in 15th and 16th century: it was common to turn away through northern rivers a ship filled in with fouls (unclear) in order to cast them away from society. In fact madness was considered sinful, summarizing all vices and in some way it was a kind of acknowledgement of the sane world’s hipocrisy.

Once Mc Murphy comes back to the clinic, he is officially declared socially dangerous thus, the mental hospital becomes both a second prison and a grave.

The novelist Kesey wrote this story after having worked inside a mental asylum as an operator.

The film actually is not that trusty to the book: Kesey’s novel is narrated in first person narration by Chief Bromden, a native American who was though to be deaf and dumb by all the clinic’s medical staff. This character plays a very important role, but as a result of his hallucinations the reader can’t fully trust his words in the novel. The movie is much less introspective and focuses mostly on the conflict between Mc Murphy and Nurse Ratched.

The book was written in the late 50s when the United States were engaged in the Cold War with Soviet Union; in this period a great number of young people begun questioning themselves about the values of power. Chief Bromden character takes this point through and shows how the collectivity tries to overwhelm people like Mc Murphy.

The film has been criticized because of its fake portrais of mental hospitals and Kesey himself disliked the movie and most of all the casting of Jack Nicholson as Mc Murphy.
Thank you very much for your help! It's been really kind of you:)

"The cuckoo bird nests into other birds’ nests but his own one (don't understand this) and as a consequence its chicks are raised (?) by other birds." With this sentence I ment to say that these kind of birds (the cuckoos), do not nest in their own nests, in fact they entrust their eggs the future chicks to the cures of other unaware birds.

raised ----> yep, you're right. I got confused with the verb "rise, rose, risen".

I'll try to rewrite the unclear sentences!

Many thanks