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Hi teachers,
Context:
People don’t like looking at me. I know that, Dr Treves,’ he said. ‘They usually laugh or scream.’
‘Well, I don’t want nurses to laugh at you, Joseph,’ I said angrily. ‘I want them to help you.’

Assuming that we know that 'me' is 'Joseph Merrick', Would these be good questions and answers for the text?
1. What do people do to Merrick most of the times? They usually laugh or scream
2. What didn’t Dr Treves want to happen? He didn't want the nurses to laugh at Joseph.
3. What did Dr Treves want the nurses to do to Merrick? He wanted them to help him.

Could I use another verb instead of 'want'? If so, could you suggest one please?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Hi TS!

1. What do people do to Merrick most of the time? They usually laugh or scream.
2. What did Dr. Treves wish would not happen? He didn't want the nurses to laugh at Joseph.
3. What did Dr. Treves hope the nurses would do for Merrick? He wanted them to help him.

"Most of the time" is the idiom that means "usually".
When abbreviated "doctor" requires a period: Dr.
For 2. there's nothing wrong with negating "did". It was my preference to move "not". Emotion: wink
Shawn791. What do people do to Merrick most of the time? They usually laugh or scream.
Hi Shawn,
Thank you for your corrections.Emotion: smile This time my sentences were very poorly written.Emotion: sweating
To write the below one, I assume that since synonyms for 'usually' can be, 'in most situations, in most cases' it should be 'in most times', I was absolutely wrong.Emotion: tongue tied
What do people do to Merrick most of the times? They usually laugh or scream.
Better, 'They most of the time laugh or scream'. OR 'Most of the time they laugh or scream.' Right?
Shawn792. What did Dr. Treves wish would not happen? He didn't want the nurses to laugh at Joseph.
Then apart from yours, it could also be like this, couldn't it?
2. What didn’t Dr Treves wish to happen? He didn't want the nurses to laugh at Joseph.
Then in the answer I should use 'wish' instead of 'want', just for the sake of the question. Right?
Shawn793. What did Dr. Treves hope the nurses would do for Merrick? He wanted them to help him.
3. What did Dr. Treves hope the nurses would do for Merrick? He wanted them to help him.
Then the answer should be, 'He hoped they would help him.' Right?
Shawn79When abbreviated "doctor" requires a period: Dr.
My book doesn't have it. I thought the same at the beginning,
Have a look at this )

TS
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Hi Shawn,
Sorry, I put a link that can't be use in the forum.
This one will work, http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/DrDr/pkjwb/post.htm

TS
Thinking SpainBetter, 'They most of the time laugh or scream'. OR 'Most of the time they laugh or scream.' Right?
The red one is better. "Most of the time" sounds best at the beginning or end, most of the time. Emotion: wink
Thinking SpainThen apart from yours, it could also be like this, couldn't it?2. What didn’t Dr Treves wish to happen? He didn't want the nurses to laugh at Joseph.Then in the answer I should use 'wish' instead of 'want', just for the sake of the question. Right?
Yes, the question in red is correct. If you want the answer to contain "wish" then it should be: "He wished the nurses would not laugh at Joseph." It's "laugh" that we need to negate here, not "wished".
Thinking SpainThen the answer should be, 'He hoped they would help him.' Right?
Yes, you're right! Emotion: smile
Thinking SpainMy book doesn't have it. I thought the same at the beginning,Have a look at this
Thank you for sharing that. I'm not aware of all regional differences in English, but I try to mention them when I can. I was not aware of this one. My suggestion is since, according to the link, it's acceptable either way in British English you should use the period because it's still the only accepted form in American English. An opinion of course. I guess it doesn't matter if you are teaching British English only.
Hi Shawn,
Thank you so much for your time, patience, and advice.Emotion: smile
Just to end with this one, are both of them correct or just letter 'a'?
1. What didn’t Dr Treves wish to happen?
a. He wished the nurses would not laugh at Joseph.
b. He didn’t wish the nurses to laugh at Joseph.

TS
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First you need "would" not the infinitive:

a. He wished the nurses would not laugh at Joseph.
b. He didn’t wish the nurses would laugh at Joseph.

They mean different things.

a. He wants it to stop (the laughing at Joseph).
b. It was not his desire, idea, hope, wish, etc. (that they laugh at him) but it doesn't say that he wants it to stop.

What did you wish for?

a. I wished for toy y.
b. I didn't wish for toy x.

This doesn't mean you don't want toy X, only that it's not what you asked for.

I had a hard time trying to think of how to explain this. It's really just the literal effect of negating one verb over the other. Emotion: smile
Shawn79I had a hard time trying to think of how to explain this.
Hi Shawn,
Thank you for your effort. I bet you had a hard time to explain that.Emotion: nodding
I can't find myself the exact corresponding sentences in Spanish. Though it is very clear your explanation.
Maybe you have beat your own previous best time (on me). Does that make sense? Emotion: it wasnt me

TS