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I've always had this big problem. I don't think I can distinguish would from will in some cases.
I'm considering the cases/dialects where /l/ is very dark and the tip of the tongue doesn't touch the roof of the mouth, and it might even become a kind of vowel or semivowel (feel is almost fee-oh, milk is almost mee-oak, etc.)

Now, as far as I know, "will" becomes "wull" in normal connected speech.
The result is, when I try to say these I can't make a distinction:

I will do it.
I would do it.

How is the distinction made? [:^)]
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I don't understand what you mean, it's just that "would do it" and "will do it" both sound somewhere around /wʊdːʉɪt/ to me, in connected speech. Maybe the difference lies in the vowel... I susped the vowel in "will do" might be a diphthong, and that might be the only way to distinguish it from "would do". But I'll keep investigating... lol.

By the way, do you happen to know any good books on English phonology you can recommend? What I'm looking for is something more than an accent reduction course, something comprehensive, where important phonological features are not omitted or overly simplified. I'm particularly interested in the features of connected speech in the major dialects (no matter whether anyone's considered them standard or not). Thanks.
KooyeenBy the way, do you happen to know any good books on English phonology you can recommend? What I'm looking for is something more than an accent reduction course, something comprehensive, where important phonological features are not omitted or overly simplified. I'm particularly interested in the features of connected speech in the major dialects (no matter whether anyone's considered them standard or not).
I don't know any book that discusses connected speech in detail. There are some journal articles here and there that talk about reduced forms. I haven't found a book that discusses all phonological processes in detail.

If you know german, there is a book that discusses all phonological processes in english.

"Grundzüge der englischen Phonetologie: Allgemeine Systematik" This is by C.-J. Bailey.

"English phonetic transcription" by same author expands on the same material.
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