Dear All,

I have been reading and using this site with much interest and thanking for all the moderators who answer to the questions...! this is an amazing site.

I am a learner and would like to help my friend who wants to put a note on a restaurant's door.

He is going to have a performance/band playing at the restaurant and wants to permit entrance only to those who use the restaurant. i.e. People can not take seats without meal/drink orders, people can not just go in only to watch the performance for free.

I hope the situation is clear...

Can he say:

'Sorry, Only restaurant users are permitted'
'Sorry, Restaurant's customers only'

The thing is that which sounds more natural...? Or are there any other sentences that native speakers normally use? I suppose he has some English speaking customers and does not want to sound too impolite.

Thank you in advance,

Yuuki
Hi Yuuki,
'Sorry, Only restaurant users are permitted'
'Sorry, Restaurant's customers only'


Restaurant users is a not a familiar or often used expression. "Restaurants' customers only" doesn't necessarily imply that they need to spend money or sufficient money.

Here are two alternatives, which you can modify to better suit your needs.

1) Welcome to tonight's band: "The Japan Band". Cover charge is $10.

A cover charge is a fee that is charged over and above food and drinks.

cover charge
n.
A fixed amount added to the bill at a nightclub or restaurant for entertainment or services.

2) 1) Welcome to tonight's band: "The Japan Band". Minimum order is $15 per table.

That means that your bill for food and drinks must be equal to or greater than $15.

I think "cover charges" are more common with night clubs. The statements above are not polite or impolite. They are simply statements. If you want in, here are the rules. That is common and accepted.

I hope that helps you.

MountainHiker
Dear Mountainhiker,

Thank you very much for your reply.

>"Restaurants' customers only" doesn't necessarily imply that they need to spend money or sufficient money.

It is interesting. If we say" you must be a 'restaurant customer' (in Japanese)" it pretty much means that you have to order some food, I think...

Anyway, thinking that their concept is to get more people to try out their food, so probably
>2) Welcome to tonight's band: "The Japan Band". Minimum order is $15 per table.
is the best as cover charge does not necessarily make them order food. I think I will suggest this one to my friend.

But again, can I ask if is there a way to imply 'you can come in only if you are going to order some food at the restaurant' without stating the amount?
---Or it simply doesnt exist...?

Sorry if I am asking too many, but I am interested in subtle differences in English and Japanese.
dont have to answer if you cant be bothered.Emotion: smile

thank you very much.

Yuuki
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Yuuki,

How about this...

<Customers must order food and/or drinks.>>

The problem of not specifying an amount is that someone might occupy their location for the entire evening and ONLY order a diet coke. But if it is a popular restaurant/bar, most, if not all, people will order an appropriate amount of food and/or drink.

When you have a short message, you can be terse without being rude. Here we are merely being factual. Most people will immediately understand that to pay for the band they will have to eat or drink something. I would think that most (all?) people entering a resturaunt or bar would eat and/or drink anyway.

Hope that helps.
Dear mountainhiker,

thanks for your reply. it is so amazing that you receive a reply so quickly!

>I would think that most (all?) people entering a resturaunt or bar would eat and/or drink anyway.

It is soooo true. haha, i have been a bit silly.

Thanks again for your help, kind and very detailed explanation.

Have a nice day.

Yuuki
I hope that they put on a good show. Emotion: smile
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