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Hello. I wrote two dialogues.

The other day, I posted these, but one of the word turned into a soccer ball.

So I posted them again. Will you check them?

No. 1 (M is a police officer.)

M: You realize you were going sixty in a 30 mile-an-hour zone.

F: Never, officer! I had no idea I was going that [ so ] fast.

M: Please check your speedometer from time to time while driving.

No. 2

M: I'm supposed to [will] have a job interview with Ms. Brown.

F: Oh, you must be Mr. Shults. Please be seated [ take / have a seat ].

I'll let her know you are here [ came here ].

M: Thank you. And would you tell me where the [ your ] restroom is?

Thank you!
Comments  
KentaM: You realize you were going sixty in a 30 miles-per-an-hour zone.>> "miles per hour" (MPH) is strictly correct, but miles-an-hour is also heard.

F: Never, officer! I had no idea I was going that [ so ] fast.>>> Both "that fast" and "so fast" are correct.

M: Please check your speedometer from time to time while driving.

No. 2

M: I'm supposed to [will] have a job interview with Ms. Brown.>> If he has a prior appointment, then, he would just say "I have..."

F: Oh, you must be Mr. Shults. Please be seated [ take / have a seat ].>> Both "take" and "have" are correct.

I'll let her know you are here [ came here ].

M: Thank you. And would you tell me where the [ your ] restroom is?
Thank you very much. Your explanation is easy for me to understand!
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Hi,
I agree mainly with the above reply Oct 31 2:19. However, I like "I am supposed to have a job interview....."

Also I prefer "I will let he know that you are here."

We do not start a sentence with "And" so I would prefer: "Would you tell me where the restroom is please?"

I hope this helps you.

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Kind regards,
Joanne Asselman
Your comment is very helpful. Thank you!
Please note there is an error in the above and it should read

Also I prefer "I will let him know that you are here."
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Hi,
In fact, in casual speech we do often start a sentence with 'and'. It typically indicates something is an afterthought.

egI'd like a Coke and a Mars bar, please. And give me a lottery ticket, please.

Best wishes, Clive