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Hello everybody!
Could anybody please answer the next questions?

1. Here is a lot information about it.
2. There is a lot information about it here.

Are both of these sentences correct if I speak British English? If they are, do they mean the same?
I think the second one is really correct but I am not sure of the first.

3. What language do you think is the most difficult?
4. What language do you think the most difficult is?

I guess the third one is right, isn't it?

If there are some mistakes in my post (not only in the sentences I've written), correct me please.
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3. What language do you think is the most difficult?
4. What language do you think the most difficult is?

I guess the third one is right, isn't it?

When we ask for information, we often say somethink like "Could you tell me.. ". If you begin a question like this, the word order is different from a simple question. We put auxiliary verb before the subject in first part of question only "Could you...", but in the embedded question the word order doesn't change.

So, here are some examples of questions with embedded parts:

Do you know what time it is? (not ... is it?)

Could you please tell me where the post office is? (not ... is the post office)

What language do you think the people in front of us are speaking? (not ... are people speaking)
Well, I see it.

But what about the sentences (3) and (4) in the concrete? Is one of them correct? Are they both wrong? After reading your post, I think the fourth one is right. But I am not sure at all!

If they are both incorrect, may be it should sound like this:

"Do you think what the most difficult language is?"
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Hello Ruslana

1. Here is a lot information about it. ] Change this to "Here is a lot of information about it".

2. There is a lot information about it here. ] Change this to "There is a lot of information about it here".

These are both correct in British or American English.

3. What language do you think is the most difficult? ] This is ok.

4. What language do you think the most difficult is? ] Change this to "What do you think the most difficult language is?"

MrP
Good day MrPedantic!

Thank you very much. And do sentences (1) and (2) mean ABSOLUTELY the same?
They are. Just the level of emphasise on "here" is different in the two sentences. When "here" comes in the begining of the sentence, the speaker/writer emphasises more on "here".
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Well, I see.

Many thanks to all who has helped me!
Hello again!

One more question has come into my mind... It is about the sentences (1) and (2).

What is the word order if I want to ask? For example:

(a) IS THERE a lot of information about it HERE?
(b) IS THERE a lot information HERE about it?

(c) IS HERE a lot of information about it?
(d) IS a lot of information about it HERE?
(e) IS a lot of information HERE about it?

I think the correct variants are (a) and (c). Am I right? Which are correct?
Hello Ruslana

(1) "There is/are X here" --> "Is/Are there X here?"
Is there any question here?
Are there any people here who can speak Russian? (who …: extraposed relative)
Is there any information here about winter festivals held in Moscow? (about … : extraposed prep phrase)
(2) "There is/are here X" --> "Is/Are there here X?" (when X is a heavy phrase).
Are there here any people who can speak Russian?
Is there here any information about winter festivals held in Moscow?
(3) "Here is/are X" --> "Is/Are here X?"
Are here any people from Moscow?
Is here any information about winter festivals held in Moscow?

I think #1 and #2 are commoner than #3.

paco
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