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Hi

Which definition of "would" in dictionary is used?

"I wouldn't know=there's no reason for me to know, why do you expect me to know"

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From the Oxford Dictionary

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/would

Be aware that 'would' is a function word, so it has no true definitions. It only has uses. It shares this characteristic with words like 'the' and 'of'.

5 Expressing a conjecture, opinion, or hope.
‘I guess some people would consider it brutal’
‘I would have to agree’
‘I would imagine that they'll want to keep it’

More examples:
‘They may struggle against Wales and I wouldn't rule out a Scots win over there.’
‘It would be futile to hope that athletes might be encouraged toward exemplary behaviour.’
‘The input from the communities has not been as strong as one would have hoped.’
‘I have still to speak to the school, but I wouldn't think this would bring out any issues.’
‘We would hope to address both of these problems by having a dedicated service.’
‘It would seem that on request of the King, a ship had to be made to fulfil the obligations of the townsmen.’
‘We would therefore hope he will take on board the feelings of fellow residents.’
‘I would describe the event as a convivial talk with a rather short period for questions.’
‘Celtic shouldn't lose at home to a team who have had such a difficult season, but I wouldn't rule it out.’
‘There are rumours this could be the last shuttle flight, and I wouldn't be surprised.’
‘Last week's piece on software piracy drew more than a few comments, as you would expect.’
‘He incurred three short suspensions, which would seem to indicate that he still has work to do.’
‘I get involved in spite of myself and, to be honest, I wouldn't have it any other way.’
‘I simply mentioned that I wouldn't mind going to Skuba but doubted my friends would come.’
‘To be honest I wouldn't really consider Eldon Hole a caving trip, although it is a fine pitch.’
‘I hope some of you can make it to one of our performances and it would be brilliant to hear some feedback!’
‘There are only a couple of events that we would call sports, the rest are just bizarre battles.’
‘You'd think that it might be important for her to be able to hear opponents, wouldn't you?’
‘I'd imagine that serious fans will feel really let down.’
‘It would be lovely to hear the boy's chatter and not feel left out when they are speaking together.’

CJ

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"I wouldn't know=there's no reason for me to know, why do you expect me to know"

It could mean those two or it could mean it is outside their realm of knowledge or understanding.

But isn't this definition different from "there's no reason for me to know, why do you expect me to know"?

Each of those are different.

The first indicates that the person feels he/she is not obligated to know.


The second indicates the person wonders why the other should expect him/her to know.


I gave you a third option.

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Tara2

But isn't this definition different from "there's no reason for me to know, why do you expect me to know"?

No dictionary is going to explain every use of 'would' that is possible in the English language. You are asking far too much of books to explain this to you.

You already had a more exact definition of I wouldn't know as

there's no reason for me to know, why do you expect me to know

so it's hard to understand what you expected to gain by asking for a less exact definition of would such as you find in a dictionary.

The definition you already have is much more specific to the exact words "I wouldn't know" than any dictionary entry on 'would' could possibly give you. You'll never find a source that will tell you the precise meanings of separate entries for "I wouldn't know", "I would think so", "I wouldn't assume so", "I would believe that", and every word group with 'would'.

Read the examples given in my previous post to get the "feel" of how 'would' is used as a conjecture, opinion, or hope, and you may be able to see why all of those examples are grouped under that heading. In general, you need to read as much English as possible if you want to get the "feel" of the language. Studying definitions of words is good, but it's not enough to acquire the "feel" that you need for words like 'would'.

The dictionary entry that I provided for you is the closest possible to the usage of 'would' that occurs in your example sentence. We have to be flexible in reading dictionaries. In this case, "opinion" and "expectation" have to be taken as similar enough that "there's no reason for me to know, ..." has to be taken as a sort of opinion.

CJ

Thank you very much

Thanks a lot CJ

Does "I would know" always mean "We put ourself outside ourself" like what said in the below link?

https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/i-would-know?reply=588754388232808202#588754388232808202

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Tara2Does "I would know" always mean "We put ourself outside ourself" like what said in the below link?

No. That was a clever way for that contributor to explain that usage in that context. "I would know" may have that effect in several different verbal environments, but I would hesitate to say "always".

The idea of putting yourself outside yourself comes up when explaining 'would', and the related idea of going into a different world that is not the real world also does. That's because 'would' often suggests something imagined.

CJ

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