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I don't wear wrinkled/folded clothes. I would always iron it before putting on it.
I just took out the heap of wrinkled/folded clothes from the corner of a cup-board, and had sent it to a laundry for ironing it.

Could you please correct my sentences?
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User_garyI don't wear wrinkled/folded clothes. I would always iron them/my clothes it before putting them on it.

I just took out the heap of wrinkled/folded clothes from the corner of a cupboard, and had sent it them to a laundry to iron for ironing it.

Could you please correct my sentences?

In the second sentence, you could say "for ironing" but I find "to iron" more natural.

Clothes are treated as plural.

Clothes that are "folded" have been taken care of and "bent" the way you store them. A folded shirt goes in your drawer. A "wrinkled" item of clothing has "bends" that you don't want. Sometimes, if you fold a shirt before packing it in a suitcase (or even storing it in a drawer" you may want to iron out the wrinkle from where it was folded. Usually, if you refer to a pile of folded clothing, however, someone has washed and dried them and prepared them to be put away properly.
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Thanks a lot Grammar Greek.
Can I also say, "It seems he has not ironed his shirt today. It's full of wrinkles"?
User_garyThanks a lot Grammar Greek.

Can I also say, "It seems he has not ironed his shirt today. It's full of wrinkles"?

Yes, that's fine! Or you can say "It's very wrinkled!"