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Write a sentence using each of the following relative pronouns correctly in a subordinate clause.

1. whomever (objective)

2. whoever (nominative)

3. who (nominative)

4. whom (objective)

5. which (nominative/objective)

6. that (nominative/objective)

i have to do this three times and i was wondering if anyone could give me an exampple of each???

it would be very much appriciated!!
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Comments  
Okay, the thing to remember is that people are one of two things in a sentence. Either they do something (nominative or subjective) or something is done to them (objective). Who is always a subject; whom is always an object. Which and that vary by their position in the sentence.

1. whomever (objective)
Jack hits the ball to whomever has a mitt. (Indirect object)

2. whoever (nominative)
Whoever has a glove can play.

3. who (nominative)
Who is at the door?

4. whom (objective)
Whom did you see when you opened the door?

5. which (nominative/objective)
Which is my slice of pie? (Nominative). The choice boiled down to which came first. (Objective)

6. that (nominative/objective)
That is never an option. (Nominative). I don't think much of that. (Objective).

Hope this helps.
Hi, Doctor D

YOur first example is incorrect. It should be the nominative case 'whoever.'

whoever has a mit is a noun clause, with whoever as the subject of the verb 'has.'
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So, we need a new example:

Give this book to whomever you like.
Doctor DSo, we need a new example:

Give this book to whomever you like.

There we go! Emotion: smile

Doctor DOkay, the thing to remember is that people are one of two things in a sentence. Either they do something (nominative or subjective) or something is done to them (objective). Who is always a subject; whom is always an object. Which and that vary by their position in the sentence.
1. whomever (objective)

Jack hits the ball to whomever has a mitt. (Indirect object)
2. whoever (nominative)

Whoever has a glove can play.

3. who (nominative)

Who is at the door?

4. whom (objective)

Whom did you see when you opened the door?

5. which (nominative/objective)

Which is my slice of pie? (Nominative). The choice boiled down to which came first. (Objective)

6. that (nominative/objective)

That is never an option. (Nominative

Sorry to be picky Doctor D, buy the poster asked us to write sentences containing a list of wh-relative pronouns (and also 'that' as a relative) correctly used in a subordinate clause (i.e. a relative subordinate clause). I think you'll find that only your examples 1. and 2. actually contain subordinate relative clauses. Your others are either simple sentences or, as in 4, a main clause, and the pronouns are not relative.

It's obviously just an oversight on your part, so do you want to post another reply that addresses the original question?

BillJ
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Starting afresh (I shouldn't have skimmed through this question). Yes, this is a tough exercise.

1. whomever (objective)
Jack will hate whomever you love.

2. whoever (nominative)
Jack will like whoever has money.

3. who (nominative)
A thief is a man who steals your money.

4. whom (objective)
The thief is a man whom we all hate.

5. which (nominative/objective)
(Nominative) Which of them hates me more is a question still to be decided. (Objective) I haven't decided which of them hates me more.

6. that (nominative/objective)
(Nominative) That no one would believe you is exactly what I expected. (Objective) I expected that no one would believe you.

If anyone has better examples, let them comment now or forever hold their peace.
Doctor D
5. which (nominative/objective)

(Nominative) Which of them hates me more is a question still to be decided. (Objective) I haven't decided which of them hates me more.

6. that (nominative/objective)

(Nominative) That no one would believe you is exactly what I expected. (Objective) I expected that no one would believe you.

I'm really sorry Doctor D, but your 5. and 6. examples are still not relatives. In 5, 'which' is a pronoun, but not relative, and in 6, 'that' is a conjunction introducing content (not relative) clauses. May I suggest:

5. I can see the books [which are on the shelf] (subject)

I know the book [which you like]. (object)

6. I like a book [that makes grammar easy] (subject)

The car [that I bought] has gone wrong. (object)

BillJ
I see I need to refresh my technical grammar. It is easy to go astray with the all-purpose "that." However, I am not so sure that the phrases used in example five are not relative pronouns. Are really saying that "which... hates me more" is not a subordinate clause introduced by a noun-substitute?
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