Tables give information about sales of fairtrade-labelled coffee and bananas in 1999 and 2004 in five European countries.

Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

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The tables compare turnovers from Fairtrade-labelled coffee and bananas in 1999 and 2004 in five EU members. These members are the UK, Switzerland, Denmark, Belgium and Sweden.

Overall, both coffee sales and banana sales were higher in 2004 than that in 1999, except for banana purchases in Sweden and Denmark.

Among five nations, Switzerland and Denmark profited enormously from coffee in 1999 with 3 million euros and 1.8 million euros respectively. These countries are followed by the UK (1.5m), Belgium (1m) and Sweden (0.8m). All five members saw an increase in coffee purchases from 1999 to 2004. Strikingly, the coffee turnovers of the UK in 2004 were about 13 times as great as that in 1999 whereas four remaining countries saw about one-fold or two-fold rise between these two specific years.

Similarly, Switzerland and Denmark came top in selling bananas in 1999. However, Switzerland gained 15 million euros, which was roughly sevenfold higher than Denmark (2m). Meanwhile, three other countries didn’t make a higher profit than Denmark. From 1999 to 2004, Switzerland, the UK and Belgium tended to grow gradually. Sweden and Denmark, in contrast, decline slightly.


(187 words)

You did not understand this task at all. You used a lot of incorrect vocabulary words.



The tables (How many tables? How are they different?) compare turnovers (wrong word.) from (wrong word.) Fairtrade-labelled coffee and bananas in 1999 and 2004 in five EU members. These members are the UK, Switzerland, Denmark, Belgium and Sweden.

Overall, both coffee sales and banana sales were higher in 2004 than that in 1999, except for bananas purchases in Sweden and Denmark.

Among five nations, Switzerland and Denmark profited (wrong word. Denmark and Switzerland do not grow bananas or coffee. They do not export these items.) enormously from coffee in 1999 with 3 million euros and 1.8 million euros respectively. These countries are followed by the UK (1.5m), Belgium (1m) and Sweden (0.8m). All five members saw (wrong word.) an increase in coffee purchases from 1999 to 2004. Strikingly, the coffee turnovers (wrong word.) of the UK in 2004 were about 13 times as great as that in 1999 whereas the four remaining countries saw (wrong word. Countries do not see things..) about one-fold or two-fold rise between these two specific years.

Similarly, Switzerland and Denmark came top in selling (wrong phrase.) bananas in 1999. However, Switzerland gained (wrong word.) 15 million euros, which was roughly sevenfold higher than Denmark (2m). Meanwhile, three other countries didn’t (Do not use contractions in formal writing.) make a higher profit (wrong word.) than Denmark. From 1999 to 2004, Switzerland, the UK and Belgium tended to grow gradually. (wrong phrase.) Sweden and Denmark, in contrast, decline (wrong form.) slightly.

Here is a sample essay to study.

To get the highest marks for Task 1, you have to combine categories in logical ways, not just copy numbers from the graphic and put them in your text. You also must read the instructions very carefully to be sure that you understand the task.

The most frequently misused vocabulary words are described in this advice.

IELTS TASK 1: Hints, Tips And Advice

Vocabulary Words For Task 1: Reference Post




The two tables, the first for bananas and the the second for coffee, list the sales of these Fairtrade agricultural products in 1999 and 2004 to five nations in the European Union: the UK, Switzerland, Belgium, Denmark, and Sweden.

Overall, sales of both products went up in the four countries over the period. Two exceptions were the sales of bananas to Belgium and Switzerland, which decreased slightly.

In detail, 30.7 million euros worth of coffee were sold to these countries in 2004 compared to 8.1 in 1999, a difference of 22.6 million euros. Eighty percent of this increase was due to the UK, which spent an additional 18.5 million, 20 million versus 1.5 million. Switzerland contributed most of the rest; it bought 6 million euros of coffee in 2004 and 3 in 1999. In 2004, these countries spent 58.4 million euros on bananas, about triple the amount of 1999, 20.4 million. As in the coffee sales, the UK was responsible for the largest part (about 85%) of that increase, spending 15 million in 1999 and 47 in 2004. Switzerland and Denmark accounted for the rest.

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Hello AlpheccaStars!

Thanks for reviewing my essay 😊

I have a question for you. You have highlighted the word "saw" in 2 sentences:

  • All five members saw (wrong word.) an increase in coffee purchases from 1999 to 2004.
  • Strikingly, the coffee turnovers(wrong word.) of the UK in 2004 were about 13 times as great as that in 1999 whereas the four remaining countries saw (wrong word. Countries do not see things..) about one-fold or two-fold rise between these two specific years.

So is this structure "Subject + experienced/ saw/ witnessed + a/an + adj+ noun + number + time period" suitable for subject (banana sales, coffee sales,...)?

Only living things with eyes see things.

Only living things witness events.

Only living things have experiences.

Numbers, countries, time periods, sales and other inanimate or conceptual objects do not see or witness or experience anything.

Avoid these verbs in Task 1. Task 1 is mathematical and scientific. So it is important to use vocabulary words that are mathematical and scientific. You can use them in Task 2, in which imagery may be used effectively as a literary device.

Here are some numbers that see, experience and witness. Do you think this is good for university math lecturers?