Food travels thousands of miles from producers to consumers. Some people think that it would be better for the environment and economy if people only ate the local food produced by farmers. To what extent do you agree or disagree?



Nowadays, people can eat foods produced miles away from their hometown. Some people assert that eating solely locally grown foods can offer economic and environmental benefits. This is true to some extents. However, I only partly agree with this idea because, in the long run, it can bring economic disadvantages.


To begin with, imported foods are required to be transported by fuel-consuming vehicles which are considered to be the main source of harmful air pollution. These vehicles such as cars, containers, trains usually pump out greenhouse gas emissions when travelling. Hence, the growing demands for imported foods mean a concomitant increase in the number of poisonous emissions emitted from these vehicles. Furthermore, intending to prolong their shelf life, imported foods require many chemical fertilizers and pesticides which are detrimental to the environment. In fact, due to the excessive use of chemical fertilizers, many farmlands in Vietnam are so heavily contaminated. Additionally, these products are usually packaged in unbiodegradable packaging, creating a million tonnes of wrapping waste every year in the globe.


Granted, consuming only locally produced foods supports the local economy as it creates more jobs and encourages local food-producing companies to increase their market share. If people only consume local foods, local food-producing companies would reach a wider number of audiences. As a result, they would expand their food supply chains, creating numbers of jobs and generating income for local citizens. However, in a long-term manner, these places would be isolated from other places, disabling them to keep pace with global development, therefore, undermining their economic prospects. North Korea, for example, is the self-supply country. Its policies prohibited trading with other countries and residents to travel aboard, making the country a backwater country.


In conclusion, although many believe that consuming only local foods is more beneficial for the environment and economy, I only partly agree with this as it would make the places isolated, thus, curbing the economic development.

Nowadays, people can eat foods produced miles away from their hometown. Some people assert that eating solely locally grown foods can offer economic and environmental benefits. This is true to some extents. (wrong form) However, I only partly agree with this idea because, in the long run, it can bring economic disadvantages.


To begin with, imported foods need are required to be transported by fuel-consuming vehicles which are considered to be the main source of harmful air pollution. These vehicles such as cars, containers, trains (ungrammatical series) usually pump out greenhouse gas emissions when travelling. Hence, the growing demands for imported foods mean a concomitant increase in the number of (emissions is non-count) poisonous harmful emissions emitted from these vehicles. Furthermore, intending to increase crop yield prolong their shelf life, imported foods require many chemical fertilizers and pesticides which are detrimental to the environment. In fact, due to the excessive use of chemical fertilizers, many farmlands in Vietnam are so heavily contaminated. Additionally, these products are usually packaged in non-biodegradable packaging, creating a million tonnes of wrapping waste every year in the globe. (wrong world)


Granted, consuming only locally produced foods supports the local economy as it creates more jobs and encourages local food-producing companies to increase their market share. If people only consume local foods, local food-producing companies would reach a wider larger number of customers audiences. As a result, they would expand their food supply chains, creating numbers of jobs and generating income for local citizens. However, in a long-term manner, these places would be isolated from other places, disabling them to keep pace with global development, therefore, undermining their economic prospects. (I do not understand this point. If local producers expand to serve a global customer base, they will keep pace with the economic development.) North Korea, for example, is the self-supply a self-sufficient country. Its policies prohibited trading with other countries and residents from travelling to travel aboard, making the country a backwater country.


In conclusion, although many believe that consuming only local foods is more beneficial for the environment and economy, I only partly agree with this as it would make the places isolated, thus, curbing the economic development.