Some young people are leaving the countryside to live in cities and towns, leaving only old people in the countryside. What are the problems of this issue? What can be done to solve this problem?


As the young generation deserts rural landscapes and stay in urban areas permanently, what is left outside the metropolitans is the aged population. Although this trend gives rise to significant challenges, there are some solutions to address this matter.


The main problem of young migrants to metropolis is congestion. Since there would be more household waste and more cigarette smokers, this overcrowding could worsen urban pollution. Crimes such as burglary, shoplifting and drug trafficking are also apparent in large cities as overpopulation leads to fewer job opportunities. Meanwhile, the major issue in the rural setting is the reduction of labor force and this decline can be aggravated by the retirement of old workers. As a consequence, this could weaken the economy of rural households and its dwellers may have no other choice but to settle in cities that are already congested.


In order to encourage young rural residents to remain in their hometowns, the government can improve countryside’s infrastructures. Provincial mayors can expand their universities and technical schools which may draw the attention of college-educated students to further their education. Public-private partnerships can support small business offices in rural places that may provide stable, long-term work for young job seekers. Finally, councilors in countryside may enhance network signals by constructing more cell towers within the boundaries of rural areas that may overcome isolation and may appeal young individuals to live in such places.


In conclusion, while there are several issues regarding the urban migration of young individuals, this situation can be improved if the government concentrate its strategies on developing the countryside.

As the young generation continues to desert deserts rural landscapes (wrong word) homes and villages to live and stay in urban areas permanently, what is left outside the metropolitans is the aged population. Although this trend gives rise to significant challenges, there are some solutions to address this matter.


The main problem of young migrants to metropolis (poor word choice, wrong form) is congestion. Since there would be more household waste and more cigarette smokers, this overcrowding could worsen urban pollution. Crimes such as burglary, shoplifting and drug trafficking are also apparent in large cities as overpopulation leads to fewer job opportunities. Meanwhile, the major issue in the rural setting is the reduction of in the labor force and this decline can be aggravated by the retirement of old workers. As a consequence, this could weaken the economy of rural households and the people there its dwellers (poor word choice) may have no other choice but to settle in cities that are already congested.


In order to encourage young rural residents to remain in their hometowns, the government can improve the local countryside’s infrastructures. (wrong form) Provincial mayors can expand their universities and technical schools which may draw the attention of college- bound educated students to further their education. Public-private partnerships can support small business offices in rural places that may provide stable, long-term work for young job seekers. Finally, councilors in countryside may enhance network signals by constructing more cell towers (That does not make sense. City council members do not erect dell phone towers. Telecom companies do this.) within the boundaries of rural areas that may overcome isolation and may appeal (wrong word) young individuals to live in such places.


In conclusion, while there are several issues regarding the urban migration of young individuals, this situation can be improved if the government concentrate its strategies on developing the countryside.