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In my understanding, we can use "...years/days/hours later" in the past tense.
Example: He left his family but returned home three years later.
Is it possible to use it in the future tense?
Can I say, for example, "I will go there three days later"?
Comments  
Three days later than what?

The form will work if you make it similar to your past tense example. You're comparing one event to another. You compared one past tense event to another past tense event.

Do the same thing with your future tense example.

I plan to be in Boston next Thursday, and I will go to New York three days later.

It doesn't work when you mean "later than now."

You can say, "Don't worry. I'll be there later." True, that means later than now.

But "I'll be there three days later" needs a future reference time.
You can say: I will go there in three days.

CB
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AvangiThree days later than what?

The form will work if you make it similar to your past tense example. You're comparing one event to another. You compared one past tense event to another past tense event.

Do the same thing with your future tense example.

I plan to be in Boston next Thursday, and I will go to New York three days later.

It doesn't work when you mean "later than now."

You can say, "Don't worry. I'll be there later." True, that means later than now.

But "I'll be there three days later" needs a future reference time.

I forgot to add an important factor.
A grammar book published in Japan said that we can't use "three days later" to mean "in three days' time from now."

Is the following usage acceptable?

A: He is on another phone. Could you wait?
B: I'll call him ten minutes later.
Absolutely not! You can say, "I'll call you a little bit later."

Does your grammar book offer an example?
Is "I'll call him in ten minutes" acceptable?

According to the grammar book, "I'll call him ten minutes later" is wrong.
It should be "I'll call him in ten minutes."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Correct.

I know it seems crazy.

I believe you could say, "A little while ago it was exactly three o'clock. I'll call you three hours later than that." It would be an impractical thing to say, but I think it would be correct.

It's now twelve o'clock. I'll call you two hours later than that. "Than that" is necessary here.

I think it's correct, but no one in his right mind would say it.