I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown beer in English as "dark." Is there a word in English for yellow beer? For example, I think there are only two kinds of St. Pauli Girl beer sold in the U.S., one of them dark brown and the other yellow. I can refer to the former as "dark St. Pauli Girl." How can I refer to the other kind?

I hope the answer isn't "light," because that word is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

Dan Amodeo
E-mail: take my last name, all lower case, put a seven in the middle, then add at earthlink dot net
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown beer in English as "dark." Is there a word in ... kind? I hope the answer isn't "light," because that word is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

Traditionally, British brewers have used "pale" to describe light-coloured ales.
A well-known type is India Pale Ale IPA.
Matti
I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown beer in English as "dark." Is there a word in ... kind? I hope the answer isn't "light," because that word is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

helles Bier (G);
Lagerbier (G) = lager (E)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown beer in English as "dark." Is there a word in ... kind? I hope the answer isn't "light," because that word is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

Amber?

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown beer in English as "dark." Is there a word in ... kind? I hope the answer isn't "light," because that word is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

Are you people taking the *** or what?
'Dark Beer' is Bitter, or in Scotland, Heavy.
'Yellow Beer' is lager.
DC
I think you can correctly refer to a dark brown ... is used by U.S. brewers to mean low calorie (ugh!).

Are you people taking the *** or what? 'Dark Beer' is Bitter, or in Scotland, Heavy. 'Yellow Beer' is lager.

Nice try, but it's more complex than that even in ale-drinking countries.
I've drunk some real ales here in England brewed, I believe, with Golden Something hops that were as light-coloured if not lighter than some of the mass-produced lagers.
And all the beers I grew up with in Canada were light-coloured but some were lagers and some were ales.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
On 25 Jun 2004, Django Cat wrote

Are you people taking the *** or what? 'Dark Beer' is Bitter, or in Scotland, Heavy. 'Yellow Beer' is lager.

Nice try, but it's more complex than that even in ale-drinking countries. I've drunk some real ales here in England ... all the beers I grew up with in Canada were light-coloured but some were lagers and some were ales.

Yes, fair 'nuff, Harvey, there's a fine light ale in these Northern parts 'Pale Rider' that certainly defies categorisation. Then there's those Belgian beers like Chimay - dark and flavoursome, not really bitters. Am I right in thinking 'Molson' (?) is a Canadian Ale? A light-coloured, hoppy, very quaffable beer, used to be available in the UK but I've not seen it in a while...
DC
Am

I right in thinking 'Molson' (?) is a Canadian Ale? A light-coloured, hoppy, very quaffable beer, used to be available in the UK but I've not seen it in a while...

Molson is a brewery that makes dozens of
varieties e.g. Molson Canadian, Molson Export,
Molson Blue, etc.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
I've drunk some real ales here in England brewed, I believe, with Golden Something hops that were as light-coloured if not lighter than some of the mass-produced lagers.

The ale-vs-lager distinction has to do with the style of fermentation, mostly. Traditional ales are brewed with a top-fermenting yeast, at between 59 and 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Lagers are fermented with a bottom-fermenting yeast, at near-freezing temperatures for quite a while (commercial varieties excepted). This varies somewhat, but in genral, lagers are fermented at much colder temperatures than ales.

Because of the simpler fermentation requirements, most craft beers and microbrews are ales.
There is also a "steam" beer, which is an ale that is fermented normally, but then cold-lagered for quite a while. AFAIK, Anchor Brewing Company has the term trademarked; one page Google turned up indicated the generic name is "California Common Beer".

-=Eric

Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare. Blair Houghton.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more