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Hi guys

I read this on some EFL textbook and thought it didn't feel right! It says:

"Yes" and "No" are different from "True" and "False". When we answer negative questions and sentences (i.e. those with "not"), "No" means "Yes", and "Yes" means "No"! Look at these examples.

You're not going to the party, are you?

Ans: Yes. (= I am not going to the party.)

No. (= I am going to the party.)

So, you haven't eaten dinner yet?

Ans: Yes. (= I have not eaten dinner.)

No. (= I have eaten dinner.)

Is that so?! Because I thought if you answer "yes" to both questions, you mean "I am going" and "I have eaten."

Thanks!
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Comments  
It is totally wrong in English; it is true in Japanese.
LiveinjapanIt is totally wrong in English; it is true in Japanese.

What is wrong? The textbook or me?
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Hi,

You are correct; the text book is wrong (unless it explains about the Japanese language).
LiveinjapanHi,You are correct; the text book is wrong (unless it explains about the Japanese language).
Thanks Emotion: smile
In real conversation, the responder might answer with either and stand ready to explain if necessary. The single-word responses are inherently ambiguous

Q: You're not going to the party, are you? / So you haven't eaten dinner yet?

A1: Yes (I am / I have).
A2: No (I'm not / I haven't).
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Mister MicawberIn real conversation, the responder might answer with either and stand ready to explain if necessary. The single-word responses are inherently ambiguousQ: You're not going to the party, are you? / So you haven't eaten dinner yet?A1: Yes (I am / I have).A2: No (I'm not / I haven't).

Thank you! Emotion: smile
chenyinchengthought it didn't feel right!
No, it doesn't feel right. Here's my take on it.

You're not going, are you? / You haven't eaten, have you?

Possible answers:

-- No. ( = No, I'm not going / haven't eaten.)
-- That's true. / That's right. / That's correct. (=No, I'm not going / I haven't eaten.)
-- True. / Right. / Correct. (=No, I'm not going / I haven't eaten.)
___________

-- Yes. (Unidiomatic answer. I would advise against it.)
-- Yes, I am. / Yes, I have. ( = Yes, I am going / have eaten.)
___________

Very informally these all imply "Yes, I'm going" ("Yes, I've eaten"):

-- Am so. / Am too. (Have so. / Have too.)

-- Where did you get that idea?
-- What makes you think that?

And sometimes you'll hear this, which implies (with some regret) "No, I'm not going" ("No, I haven't eaten.")

I'm afraid not. / (very informally) 'Fraid not.

CJ
CalifJim
chenyinchengthought it didn't feel right!
No, it doesn't feel right. Here's my take on it.You're not going, are you? / You haven't eaten, have you?Possible answers:-- No. ( = No, I'm not going / haven't eaten.)-- That's true. / That's right. / That's correct. (=No, I'm not going / I haven't eaten.)-- True. / Right. / Correct. (=No, I'm not going / I haven't eaten.)___________-- Yes. (Unidiomatic answer. I would advise against it.)-- Yes, I am. / Yes, I have. ( = Yes, I am going / have eaten.)_____________Very informally these all imply "Yes, I'm going" ("Yes, I've eaten"):-- Am so. / Am too. (Have so. / Have too.)-- Where did you get that idea?-- What makes you think that?CJ

Excellent answer! Thank you very much! Emotion: big smile
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