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Which of the following sentence is correct?
1: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years otherwise it shall be forfeited.
2: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after that it will be forfeited.
3: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after the date of deposit otherwise it will be forfeited.
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Hi,

Which of the following sentence is correct?

1: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years otherwise it shall be forfeited.

2: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after that it will be forfeited.

3: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after the date of deposit otherwise it will be forfeited.

None, really, because 'otherwise' and 'after that' are not really conjunctions. That means you need to use them to start a new sentence, or at least put a comma before them or a joining word like 'and' or 'but'.

As regards meaning, I guess you definitely shouldn't forget to ask for your security deposit to be returned to you!

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveNone, really, because 'otherwise' and 'after that' are not really conjunctions. That means you need to use them to start a new sentence, or at least put a comma before them or a joining word like 'and' or 'but'.
Question 1:
really
1 a: in reality : actually<things as they really are> <there was nothing peculiar about her doing this, really — Peter Taylor> b: truly, unquestionably —used as an intensifier <a really beautiful day> c: very <look really close> <he runs really fast> 2—used to emphasize an assertion<you really should read Yeats><really, you're being ridiculous> [M-W's Col. Dic.]

I believe the first really sets in the context of 1a definition and the second really in 2 definition. Am I correct?

Question 2:
You said: ''That means you need to use them to start a new sentence, or at least put a comma before them or a joining word like 'and' or 'but'.''
Does that mean if a certain word is a conjunction, then there is no need to use a comman? I don't think so. Many times I have seen a comma is used in front of conjunctions like and and or. e.g. I went to his home to eat something, and after that I left for California. And there are also many instances when a comma is not used even in front of those words which are not conjunctions such as then.

Question 3:

1: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years, otherwise it shall be forfeited.
2: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years and after that it will be forfeited.
3: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after the date of deposit but otherwise it will be forfeited.
Are all of the above sentence correct now?
Hi,

Q1 - Yes, that seems correct.

Q2 - Whether a comma is needed before a conjunction depends on the particular sentence, especially on the length and complexity. Strictly speaking, start a new sentence for both of your original examples.

Q3 -

1: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years, otherwise it shall be forfeited. It's often written this way, but I'd start a new sentence if I wanted to write carefully.

2: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years and after that it will be forfeited. OK

3: Yes, the security deposit is refundable within six years after the date of deposit but otherwise it will be forfeited. OK

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, Clive.
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