+0
Hello Teacher!

1.He ha not yet come.

2.He has not come yet.

Which one is correct?

Thanks.
1 2
Comments  
Hi everybody,

Does anyone know whether later, after and afterwards can be used interchangeably in a sentence? If no, then how?

Thanks in advance.
SIR,

Bump!

Thanks.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I'm just a learner, but I think I can help you out.

Yes is normally used in questions (Has he come yet?) and in negative sentences (like yours). In such cases, yet is always at the end of the sentence.

However, yet is occasionally used in affirmative sentences in a formal style:
We have yet to hear from her.

In this case, yet is in a form of expectation, which can be replaced by a form of 'still':
We are still waiting to hear from her.

Welcome.

Vince..
Further to Vince's very useful comments:

1. He has not yet come.
2. He has not come yet.

The position of 'yet' in #2, as Vince suggests, is probably more usual, though you do find #1 – especially with phrasal verbs, or where the sentence continues in some other way:

3. He hasn't yet come up with a suggestion.
4. He hasn't yet come to realize that there are better ways of spending your money.

To my ears, 'he has not yet...'/'he hasn't yet' sounds slightly more neutral:

5. He hasn't yet seen the report. [Neutral – that's why we haven't had his response to the report.]
6. He hasn't seen the report yet. [Significant – when he sees the report, something will happen.]

But the difference is very small.

MrP
Interesting, Mr. P. I would have reversed them -- sort of. To me the difference is register.

"He hasn't seen the report yet." Register 2 (and neutral)
"He hasn't yet seen the report." Register 2.5 or 3 (equally neutral?)

In any case, it seems (though I would not bet a lot on it) that "yet" always occurs either after "not" or at the end of the sentence. I exclude the 'other "yet"': "Yet, he hasn't seen the report."

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Sir,

I coundn't understand the meaning of " To me the difference is register. "

What is meaning of register here?

"He hasn't seen the report yet." Register 2 (and neutral)
"He hasn't yet seen the report." Register 2.5 or 3 (equally neutral?)

Thanks.
Hanuman wrote:
1. He has not yet come.
2. He has not come yet.

Which one is correct?


Where the adverb is located has a great deal to do with its semantic contribution. For example, if "yet" is inside the verb phrase, it contributes internally (it modifies the first part of the verb). If "yet" is outside the verb, its contribution is external (it modifies the verb phrase):

1. He hasn't come yet.
2. He hasn't yet come.

Now, "yet" has essentially the same dictionary meaning in both 1. and 2. (as MrP notes), but the weight of its contribution shifts in relation to its proximity to the verb proper, and when the adverb is situated within the verb phrase itself; e.g., between "has" and "come", pin-pointing the exact anchor, the word that "yet" modifies, can be somewhat subjective (as CJ adds).
And then, when intonation kicks in:

1. He hasn't yet seen the report? But you said you gave it to him hours ago!

2. 'He hasn't come yet'? What do you mean, he hasn't come yet?

3. I said he hasn't come yet. I didn't say he wasn't coming at all.

I may have to tear up my notes on this one.

MrP
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more