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Hello

I've just seen a really great film (this one means that I've seen this film recently, e.g. yesterday?)

I've already seen a really great film (I think this one is wrong, though do not know why?)

Have you just arrived? (do you think this one expresses surprise?)

Have you already arrived? (if the one above expresses surprise, what about this one?)

Have you arrived yet? (I think this one it's just a typical question?)

You've already told me that (does this one mean that I am surprised. According to my book "already" shows that something happened sooner than expected. But I think it also shows surprise?)

You've just told me that (i think this one means that you told me something not a long time ago)

thanks
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I've just seen a really great film (this one means that I've seen this film recently, e.g. yesterday?) yesterday is pushing it, but it's possible. I'd say within the last 12 hours or so, but there's no exact time that the word recently represents.

I've already seen a really great film (I think this one is wrong, though do not know why?) I don't think anyone was expecting you to see a great film within some specified time limit, so it makes little sense to use already. You might hear this one almost jokingly:
-- Your life is so dull. What you need is to see a really great film!
-- I'm not interested. I've already seen a really great film.
Have you just arrived? (do you think this one expresses surprise?) No. It's Did you arrive a very short time ago? (For a question with just, you'd have to see some evidence of recent arrival. Maybe a look in someone's eyes that showed that they were still getting used to their new surroundings, or perhaps their hair and clothes are a bit messy, showing they haven't had time to compose themselves after their trip.)

Have you already arrived? (if the one above expresses surprise, what about this one?) It shows that the speaker did not expect the listener to have arrived yet.

Have you arrived yet? (I think this one it's just a typical question?) Yes. It shows that the speaker expects the listener may have arrived already or will arrive soon.
You've already told me that (does this one mean that I am surprised. According to my book "already" shows that something happened sooner than expected. But I think it also shows surprise?) Expectation is probably a better description than surprise in some cases. In the case of questions, surprise may be involved, but this is a statement, not a question.
You've just told me that (i think this one means that you told me something not a long time ago) Yes. You could almost say it means You told me that only a few minutes ago.
CJ
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I've just seen a really great film (this one means that I've seen this film recently, e.g. yesterday?).
This is correct.

I've already seen a really great film (I think this one is wrong, though do not know why?). This is also correct.
Depends on the usage and context. It may be that the person does not want to watch "a great film" right now because he/she has already seen one recently.

Have you just arrived? (do you think this one expresses surprise?).
It may convey surprise but not necessarily.

Have you already arrived? (if the one above expresses surprise, what about this one?)
Again, it can express surprise. It will depend on usage and context if in written form or on tone and inflexion if spoken out loud.

Have you arrived yet? (I think this one it's just a typical question?)
You are correct in assuming so.

You've already told me that (does this one mean that I am surprised. According to my book "already" shows that something happened sooner than expected. But I think it also shows surprise?)
Normally this conveys impatience rather than surprise.

You've just told me that (i think this one means that you told me something not a long time ago)
Correct.
Thank you very much for your replies!!!