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A: Have you started the task?

B: No, It is yet to start or It is yet to be started.


Please check it.

Which one is fit into the context? either "It is yet to start. or It is yet to be started. " What are the difference between them?

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kumenglishA: Have you started the task?
B: No, it is yet to start or It is yet to be started.

B's reply does not directly follow A's question. "No, I/we haven't started it yet" would be a direct answer, though in practice we would not normally bother to repeat the verb, we would just say "No, not yet".

"No, it's yet to start" / "No, it's yet to be started" are less direct answers, as if B doesn't want to take individual responsibility for doing it. In your context there is hardly a difference in meaning between them. While both are correct English, I wouldn't say that these are necessarily the most common idiomatic replies. If B wants to answer indirectly to portray that it is is not his own individual responsibility, he might say "No, it hasn't been started yet".

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A: Have you started the task?

B: No, I haven't started the task.

No, I haven't.<<<<< This is the common answer.


It is yet to start. or It is yet to be started. These are not natural answers.Clive
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Comments  

It's "has yet to".

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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