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Hi

These expressions are frequently used in Indian English. Could you please tell me how they sound to native ears? Fully natural?

(When someone is getting rude or behaving inappropriately, etc)

  1. Now you're crossing the limit.
  2. You are crossing all limits of rudeness.
  3. You are crossing your limits.
  4. This time he really crossed the limit.
  5. Do you feel I am crossing my limits.

Thanks,

Tom

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Now you've gone too far is a popular one in American English. Also, we cross the line, not the limit.

CJ

Comments  
Mr. TomThese expressions are frequently used in Indian English. Could you please tell me how they sound to native ears? Fully natural?

They are understandable but not natural. I guess "to get out of hand" is what you want. "Limit" is used in "to reach one's limit", but that goes in the other direction. When his rudeness gets out of hand, you can tell him you've reached your limit. We also say "cross the line".

Mr. TomNow you're crossing the limit.

Now you're getting out of hand.

Now youre crossing the line.

Mr. TomYou are crossing all limits of rudeness.

Now your rudeness is getting out of hand.

Now your rudeness is crossing the line.

These two are not quite the ticket. The person normally gets out of hand and crosses the line.

Mr. TomYou are crossing your limits.

"Your" does not work.

Mr. TomThis time he really crossed the limit.

This time he really crossed the line.

This time he really got out of hand.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.