In an article in Wednesday's *St. Paul Pioneer Press,* "Pilots fired for S.D. landing" by Martin J. Moylan, which can be seen for the next six days at
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/business/9604039.htm?1c

I found the following unusual use of the verb "grieve": "The fired Northwest pilots, whom neither the union nor the company would identify, are grieving their dismissal, said Will Holman, spokesman for the Northwest Airlines Air Line Pilots Association."
An unusual use in my experience, that is. As it happens, while the usage in question is not in the *Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary* at www.m-w.com , it is in MWCD11:
(quote)
Main Entry: grieve
Function: verb

transitive verb

*3 :* to submit a formal grievance concerning

(end quote)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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In an article in Wednesday's *St. Paul Pioneer Press,* "Pilots fired for S.D. landing" by Martin J. Moylan, which can ... verb transitive verb *3 :* to submit a formal grievance concerning

I never would have anticipated that meaning. Bureauspeak. I thought it meant they were mourning their dismissal, which also seemed strange and over the top..
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In an article in Wednesday's *St. Paul Pioneer Press,* "Pilots fired for S.D. landing" by Martin J. Moylan, which can ... union nor the company would identify, aregrieving their dismissal, said Will Holman, spokesman for the Northwest AirlinesAir Line Pilots Association."

They ought to be celebrating it now they can get jobs that pay more than $25K a year.
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meirman filted:
I found the following unusual use of the verb "grieve": ... Holman, spokesman for the Northwest Airlines Air Line Pilots Association."

I never would have anticipated that meaning. Bureauspeak. I thought it meant they were mourning their dismissal, which also seemed strange and over the top..

Same here...called upon to coin a new usage, I would have verbed the noun whole and said they were "grievancing"..
Wonder if R.B. greaves because he asks Maria to take a letter and address it to his wife..r
Main Entry: grieve Function: verb transitive verb *3 :* to submit a formal grievance concerning

I never would have anticipated that meaning. Bureauspeak. I thought it meant they were mourning their dismissal, which also seemed strange and over the top..

To me it wasn't so strange. I think that's probably because I've been exposed to it quite a bit. I work in a field in which such grievances are frequent between the guild I belong to and the engagers I work for, and this usage is common in that context.

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In an article in Wednesday's *St. Paul Pioneer Press,* "Pilots fired for S.D. landing" by Martin J. Moylan, which can ... (end quote) Raymond S. Wise Minneapolis, Minnesota USA E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com

A synonym for contesting, perhaps.
I, like meirman, misread the use of the verb at first glance, but also like meirman, then realized it made sense.
Joanne
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I found the following unusual use of the verb "grieve": "The fired Northwest pilots, whom neither the union nor the company would identify, are grieving their dismissal, said Will Holman, spokesman for the Northwest Airlines Air Line Pilots Association."

It's labor-managementspeak.
A union contract will include means for union employees to file a "grievance" when they think they are being treated in a way contrary to the contract. The jargon term for "to file a grievance" is "to grieve".

John Varela
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meirman filted:

I never would have anticipated that meaning. Bureauspeak. I thought it meant they were mourning their dismissal, which also seemed strange and over the top..

Same here...called upon to coin a new usage, I would have verbed the noun whole and said they were "grievancing"..

In fact, I first read the article in the newsprint version of the Pioneer Press and when I went to look it up on the Internet to write the original post to this thread I searched for "grievancing." When I didn't find it, I had to use other search terms to find the article, where I was actually surprised to (once again, of course) see that the term used was "grieving."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
I found the following unusual use of the verb "grieve": ... Holman, spokesman for the Northwest Airlines Air Line Pilots Association."

It's labor-managementspeak. A union contract will include means for union employees to file a "grievance" when they think they are being treated in a way contrary to the contract. The jargon term for "to file a grievance" is "to grieve".

Calling these words 'labor-managementspeak' and 'jargon' is, with respect, wrong. Yes, they are used in the union contract context but the meaning is hardly rare or ununusal. What does having a grievance against one's spouse mean? Or are you gents too happily married ever to have had one?
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