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Hello teachers!

Please, I'd like you to clear out this for me.

For example:

Case 1

Sara said : "tomorrow "I'll go to the beach".

Judy purposefully said "tomorrow, Sara will go to the park ".

That's a lie obviously, now I want to know how to express the term accurately, so which one should I use from the following?

-Judy lied to Sara's saying.

-Judy lied on Sara's saying.

-Judy lied at Sara's saying.

_ _ _

Case 2

Let's suppose that someone told me a lie whatever was. So I'll reply:

-Don't lie to me.

-Don't lie on me.

-Don't lie at me.

Which one and what's the difference please?


I'm confused because I notice some times people use "to me" and another time "at me".


Thank you

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anonymous-Judy lied to Sara's saying.
-Judy lied on Sara's saying.
-Judy lied at Sara's saying.

None of these are right. You can say "Judy lied about what Sara (had) said".

anonymous-Don't lie to me.
-Don't lie on me.
-Don't lie at me.

The usual way to say this is "Don't lie to me".

"Don't lie on me" is interpreted with "lie" meaning "recline horizontally", so it has a totally different meaning.

"Don't lie at me" is somewhat marginal. It may be possible when the lies are perceived as forcefully directed towards one.

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anonymousI'm confused because I notice some times people use "to me" and another time "at me".

I'd like to see the whole sentence with "at me". Please post it if you have it.

The only use of "lie" with "at" that I've commonly seen is to name the proceeding where the lie occurred.

lied at [the trial / the hearing / the inquest / the conference]

CJ

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Comments  

Thank you very much teachers GPY, CJ. It's clear, I think I will not forget its usage now.

Regarding the term "lied at me", I recall that I've heard it in a TV show between tow persons, it wasn't from a considerable source, of course.

Thanks again

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anonymousI recall that I've I heard it on a TV show

OK. Probably a sitcom? (situation comedy)

You hear all kinds of slang on those shows that you won't hear on a news interview.

CJ

“from a considerable source“

I’ve never heard this usage before, & don’t believe it would be correct. I’m inclined to think of “reputable source”, or perhaps “knowledgeable source” as being appropriate.