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Hi,

I wrote the following to remind my compatriots of an easy way to learn the long big English words by hearts. Correct me where I went wrong. Thanks.

One day, there was this big word "chandelier" on the blackboard while I was stepping onto the platform of a freshman's classroom at a senior high school. As soon as I spotted it, I asked my adorable pupils who put it down there and what for!

And they replied that it was their great maestro of physics, who was also known as English powerhouse. He wanted to teach them how to learn the big word by heart in a hetorodox way.

This is the way he taught it--he pronouced the word like "shun de lee uen dien (閃得離遠點)," which litterally means in Chinese "shunning far away from (chandelier)." Thus, the students caught on to the meaning and the sound.

I have a different approach from the great maestro of physics on this for fear that the non-orthodox method might mislead my pupils. What I use is to divide chandelier into two parts. The first part, chandel, is a variant of candle, and the other, ~er, stands for a tool or instrument. Therefore, when they are combined together, we get the meaning of "a tool or instrument for candles."

As a side note: since we're not native speakers, we always have a hard time committing those long and big English to memory. I guess memorizing them for a native is as good as breathing! That's why we need to search for a magic way.
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I wrote the following to remind my compatriots of an easy way to learn long English words by heart. Correct me where I went wrong. Thanks.

One day, there was the big word "chandelier" on the blackboard when I stepped onto the platform of a freshman classroom at a high school. As soon as I spotted it, I asked my pupils who wrote it there and why, and they replied that it was their physics teacher, who was also known as an excellent English teacher / as fluent in English. He wanted to teach them how to learn the word by heart in an unorthodox way.

This is the way he taught it: he pronounced the word "shun de lee uen dien (閃得離遠點)," which literally means in Chinese "shunning far away from (chandelier)." Thus, the students caught on to both the meaning and the sound.

I have a different, more orthodox approach. I divide "chandelier" into two parts. The first part, "chandel", is a variant of "candle", and the other, "~er", stands for a tool or instrument. Therefore, when they are combined, we get the meaning of "a tool or instrument for candles".

Since Chinese words are all short (?!), we always have a hard time committing long English words to memory. I guess memorizing them for a native is as easy/natural as breathing! But we need to search for a mnemonic way.
Comments  
Thanks, Mister.

After your correction, I read it a few times. And I find it is more precise and fluent.