+0
Chrissy:Why did Sandy leave?
Ben:She got fed up with just being a model...I don't know if there's any truth in it, but they say she's been offered a film part.
Chrissy:So who should I get in touch with?
Ben:You mean, you'd like the job yourself...and you'd like me to have a word with my father.
Chrissy:Yes, that's what I mean.

In this case, I would say "You mean, you'd like the job for yourself..." It is like without for something is missing and the meaning is like the one in this example:
-Where did you buy this dress?
-I made it myself.

If I said "You'd like the job for yourself.", would it be wrong?

/C.M
+0
Hi,

Chrissy:Why did Sandy leave?
Ben:She got fed up with just being a model...I don't know if there's any truth in it, but they say she's been offered a film part.
Chrissy:So who should I get in touch with?
Ben:You mean, you'd like the job yourself...and you'd like me to have a word with my father.
Chrissy:Yes, that's what I mean.

In this case, I would say "You mean, you'd like the job for yourself..." It is like without for something is missing and the meaning is like the one in this example:
-Where did you buy this dress?
-I made it myself.

If I said "You'd like the job for yourself.", would it be wrong? No. But it's commonly omitted in a sentence like this,and that doesn't seem to make anyone confused about the meaning.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Thank you very much Clive!

/C.M