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Matt, your doctor called while you were out and he [wants/needs] to see you over your recent medical report.

1. Which choice is correct?

2. Does the statement imply Matt recently had a body checkup?

Thanks in advance!
Comments  
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1-- Either could be correct; the latter is more requisite than the former.
2-- Yes
Hi,

Matt, your doctor called while you were out and he [wants/needs] to see you over ('about' is more idiomatic) your recent medical report.

1. Which choice is correct? Both are OK.

2. Does the statement imply Matt recently had a body physical checkup? Not necessarily. eg perhaps the doctor is a psychiatrist.

A 'check-up' usually is a complete examination, and is usually to detect illness rather than to treat symptoms. In other words, the doctor performs many activities, services and tests for you that are not called 'check-ups'.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive, Perhaps I'm too tired to understand your explanation about physical checkup being a better choice. I read it 3 times and still don't get the point. Can you try to explain it again? I would appreciate it.
I don't know if this is a southern US phenomenon or not, but the use of "need" when it is not needed, so to speak, is becoming one of my pet peeves. It started, I believe, as a way to talk to children (angry mother: "I need you to stop that crying right now;" schoolteacher: "I need you to line up next to the door before we can go to lunch") and is now being used to address adults as though they were children (cashier: "I need you to sign this for me;" nurse: "I need you to step this way so we can get your blood pressure").
I agree that "your doctor needs to see you about your medical report" should sound more ominous than "wants to see you." But in my part of the country, it could just mean a routine follow-up, depending on the tone of voice, I suppose.
Now I feel better. Thanks for allowing me to get that off my chest.
Hi,

Perhaps I'm too tired to understand your explanation about physical checkup being a better choice. I read it 3 times and still don't get the point. Can you try to explain it again?

The phrase 'body checkup' is not idiomatic. It sounds strange.

In my experience, the common term is 'physical checkup', and this often abbreviated to 'physical'.

eg I have an appointment with the doctor tomorrow at 3pm. He's going to give me a physical.

It means an exam to make sure that everything is working OK, and that there are no problems.

Best wishes, Clive
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There's also the term "history and physical." The history is how you answer the doctor's questions about your health; the physical part is what he can observe by seeing and touching. Then, of course, there are lab tests and the various machines that go ping Emotion: smile