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Do all of the three sentences below mean the same?
1: Your suggestion has been well taken.
2: Your suggestion has been taken into consideration.
3: Your suggestion has been taken into account.

Do these sentences mean the same?
1: Your suggestion has been well taken and I have amended...
2: Your suggestion has been taken and made.

Thanks for the help.
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Comments  
Hi,
1: Your suggestion has been well taken. Your suggestion is a good and suitable one.A more common expression is 'Your point is well taken'.
2: Your suggestion has been taken into consideration.I'll consider your suggestion.
3: Your suggestion has been taken into account. I'll consider your suggestion, and see how it affects the matter.

Do these sentences mean the same?
1: Your suggestion has been well taken and I have amended... It's not a natural thing to say.
2: Your suggestion has been taken and made. Not natural. You accept or adopt a suggestion, and apply a suggestion or make a change.

Clive
Thank you very much, Clive.
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Hi,
Let me add this.

Tom says to Fred, "I think we should do . . . . X . . . . "
Fred says 'That's a good idea'.

The underlying syntax is that Tom's point was well taken by Tom, not well-taken by Fred.
It means that Tom made a good decision when he decided to offer his opinion.

Clive
Edit. This position appears to be erroneous. Sorry. - A.
Ithink the thing about "well taken" is that it functions like an adjective, so when you say "the point is well taken you mean it has been considered and thought well of. To try to put the action into the present tense would be something like, "your point is being considered and is being thought well of. We don't really use the expression as a passive verb.

(Sorry, I can't see from here if Clive mentioned "well received.") This one functions as a verb, quite differently from the adjective "well taken." Once a thing is received (present passive) the action, or process is over. The "well" goes with the action, so we don't usually say a thing is well received. But we can use all the other tenses - was well received, is being well received, had been well received, will be well received, etc.

If you use past tense with an adjective, you may mean the condition no longer exists. The car was blue. The point was well taken. The car has been blue. The point has been well taken. I suppose you can argue that this is a verb. I guess it's possible. But I've never heard it this way. The Google examples I see for "has been well taken" all morph into "has been well taken care of."

Also, another common verb for dealing with "suggestions" is "to implement." "Your suggestion has been / is being / will be implemented."
Clive Tom says to Fred, "I think we should do . . . . X . . . . "
Fred says 'That's a good idea'.

The underlying syntax is that Tom's point was well taken by Tom, not well-taken by Fred.
It means that Tom made a good decision when he decided to offer his opinion.
Hi Clive,

Wow! Talk about epiphenal moments! I've been puzzling over this for half an hour. I believe you're saying that "taking a point" is like "taking a position." "Your position is well taken [by you]." I have to admit, as many times as I've heard and used the expression, I've never thought of it that way. How bloody embarrassing!

You surely must be right! Forgive me for asking this, but do you have a handy reference? - something that can pass through my impenetrable skull?

Many thanks for the enlightenment - A. (Actually, I didn't even see your last post until after I'd written my first one.)
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Hi,
It's just how I see it.

Clive

PS - see here. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/point

17. A significant, outstanding, or effective idea, argument, or suggestion: Your point is well taken.
Thanks, Clive. It doesn't seem to address who's doing the taking, but as I continue to ponder the question, I think your approach best fits the words. I think it's just one of those things I've heard all my life, and translated based on the way I understood the dynamics of the situations when I heard it used. I think I'm plain wrong.

Edit. American Heritage, take, transitive, 13. f. to put forth or adopt as a point of argument, defense, or discussion: Your interpretation of the poem is well taken.

Oh, well. And to think I could have taken this with me to my grave!
The three statements do not mean the same.
1. Your suggestion has been well taken.
This statement means that you have accepted their suggestion and really appreciate them for it.

2. Your suggestion has been taken into consideration.
This statement means, "thank you for your suggestion; however, it M the use of your suggestion is contingent upon other factors. It may or may not be used.

3. Your suggestion has been taken into account.
This means that you appreciate the suggestion, although it may not be used, it may not be "best practice."

Statements numbers two and three basically means the same.
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