Having written many business letters I know that to convey a somewhat unfriendly tone I should sign "Yours Truly". This would be the ending to a letter about a past due account.
A more friendly letter ends "Sincerely". But why?
If you think about it "Yours Truly" seems friendlier than "Sincerely". All "Sincerely" means is that I mean what I say.
"Yours Truly" is like "Yours Faithfully" or maybe a little like the archaic "Your obiedient servant."
BTW, Do the British have an ending phrase (what's it called, the opposite of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful attitude?
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Having written many business letters I know that to convey a somewhat unfriendly tone I should sign "Yours Truly". This ... British have an ending phrase (what's it called, the opposite of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful attitude?

Two stains are more annoying than one, that's for sure.

I hope someone edits your business letters.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Having written many business letters I know that to convey a somewhat unfriendly tone I should sign "Yours Truly".

Those wacky Americans...
This would be the ending to a letter about a past due account.

I thought "Yours truly" was the norm for formal letters in the US. MS Word is always trying to end my letters that way. In Britain this phrase is reserved for letters between relatives, friends and/or lovers.
A more friendly letter ends "Sincerely". But why? If you think about it "Yours Truly" seems friendlier than "Sincerely". All ... the British have an ending phrase (what's it called, the opposite of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful

obedient, disdainful
attitude?

Well, I raise an eyebrow if I receive a formal letter that doesn't end with either "Yours sincerely" or "Yours faithfully". Anything with "Regards" is suspect.
Adrian
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Having written many business letters I know that to convey a somewhat unfriendly tone I should sign "Yours Truly". This ... British have an ending phrase (what's it called, the opposite of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful attitude?

The words used in the salutation or complimentary close of a letter are seldom paid attention to. I would not be surprised at all to see:

Dear Mr Richguy:
We have your wife. Leave $100,000 in small bills in your mailbox at midnight if you want to see her again. Do not call the police.

Enclosed please find her left ear.
With kindest personal regards,
Barking Mad Terrorist Cell #156
Having written many business letters I know that to convey a somewhat unfriendly tone I should sign "Yours Truly". This ... British have an ending phrase (what's it called, the opposite of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful attitude?

We use:
"You are, Sir, my most humble and obedient servant"

Especially apposite writing to MPs.

John Dean
Oxford
Having written many business letters I know that to convey ... of a salutation?) that conveys a superior and distainful attitude?

We use: "You are, Sir, my most humble and obedient servant" Especially apposite writing to MPs.

Ah, yes: from "The Guide to English Manners". Along the lines of "It is customary to engage your fellow passengers on public transport and in elevators in personal conservation; a common approach is to ask them how much they earn".

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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On 04 Feb 2005, John Dean wrote

We use: "You are, Sir, my most humble and obedient servant" Especially apposite writing to MPs.

Ah, yes: from "The Guide to English Manners". Along the lines of "It is customary to engage your fellow passengers on public transport and in elevators in personal conservation; a common approach is to ask them how much they earn".

"Do not omit to test the famous echo in the British Museum reading Room"
John Dean
Oxford
We Americans do not need to be taught how to behave in a way that is considered really rude, or dumb, to the Brits. It's in our genes. Things I did or said on my first trip to the British Isles at 19 years old.

1). Told someone he had bad teeth when he was beating me in a debate atHyde Park Corner. Even my, until then, supporters in the audience thought that was bad form.

2). Said, jokingly, to a group of 13 year olds that were beating mybrother and I and two American friends in soccer, "But you guys are cheating." They really looked hurt. The "just kidding" barely unruffled the feathers.

3). Taking a slice from the middle of the sliced pound cake.
4). Talking politics without checking what people believed. I told myProtestant cousins in Newry that we Americans would one day get them their freedom from the British.

5). Turned off the bathroom light in the "loo" at a pub. After I satdown some guy came up and said, "Did your mother teach you always to do that." When I sobered up I figured out what I had done.
6). Bragging about my car and how much I as a Spec 4 in the Army.
ps, I mean "how much I made as a Spec 4". I didn't even mention all the Americans who have loudly asked, when first alighting on the soil of the mother country, "Do they speak English here.?" (One of my kids friends asked that as we left for a trip together to the British Isles.)
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