Heya again Emotion: smile

From a sentence analysis perspective, please:

Question 1:

In the particular sentence: "Luke Harding visits a call centre in India where the staff take crash courses in Britishness." the "where the staff take crash courses in Britishness" is a subclause that functions as Object Compliment to the Direct Object "call centre", correct?

Question 2: If so, then what function does the word "where" have in the grammatical analysis of the sub clause "where the staff take crash courses in Britishness" and what type of word is it? Is it an adverb functioning as an adverbial?

Is it:

(A=Adverbial phrase=adverb=where)

(S=nounphrase=the staff)

(V=verb phrase=take)

(Direct Object=nounphrase=crash courses)

(A=prepositional phrase=in Britishness)

??

Thank you ever so much, I do hope you are somewhat entertained Emotion: smile
CopenhagenCallingObject Compliment
Object complement. You're not complimenting the object! Though you may compliment me, if you wish. Emotion: smile

No. It's not an object complement. The 'where' clause is a relative clause. 'where' is a relative word; some people say relative pronoun. The subordinate clause (i.e., the relative clause) modifies 'centre'.

Your analysis of the rest of the clause is correct.

[the staff] [take] [crash courses] [in Britishness]

sub. verb d.o. prep. phr.

CJ
Hmm yes BUT if the relative clause in its entirety does not function as OC in the original sentence, what function does it have?

And on the sub clause level, what function does the relative pronoun "where" have? Is it an adverbial (place-adverbial)

You are a great help and I have an endless amount of compliments at the ready for ya Emotion: smile))
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Relative clauses always have the function of modification. Since it modifies a noun, some people say they are adjectival in nature.

And yes, within the subordinate clause 'where' is a place adverbial.

CJ
mhm so in fact, the "where the staff take crash courses in Britishness" is in its entirety either an adjectival phrase functioning as a post modifier to the nounphrase call centre OR is it an adjectival phrase functioning as an adverbial in the original sentence?

("Luke Harding visits a call centre in India where the staff take crash courses in Britishness")

I hope you can follow my haphazard explanations Emotion: smile
No. There's no either/or. It's the post-modifier explanation that you want. It's like an adjective for 'call center', not an adverbial for the main clause.

If you want an example of a where-clause that is adverbial for the main clause, you'll need something like this:

Please put those things back where you found them.

CJ
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AHA! Yes I understand perfectly! wow thanks man, you removed the veil from my eyes Emotion: smile

Thank you so much!

How do I mark this puzzle as solved by CalifJim?
CopenhagenCallingHow do I mark this puzzle as solved by CalifJim?
You pull down the 'Options' menu and click on 'Verify answer' (on the relevant post). You may have to hover near 'Reply' to bring up the 'Options' menu.

CJ