I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a zip program should be referred to as "a zip'ed file". I believe we should use the term "a zipped file". My arguments for Google's results had no effect upon him. Why should we use "zip'ed" if we've already had the past participle "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?
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I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a ... "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

That's one heinous apostrophe, there. The best thing I could say about "zip'ed" is that it has absolutely no chance of catching on, since it's so bizarre. I have no idea what the people who originated the usage are thinking, unless they're trying to preserve the supposed sanctity of the program name.

"Zip'ed," in addition to being prima facie stupid, is also not quite successful in keeping people from reading "ziped"; moreover, it adds another potential mispronunciation in "zip ed," and creates the false impression of an accent mark, and who knows how that might mangle pronunciation.

Rather than preserving or drawing attention to the brand name, this frankenbastard of a term creates the impression that the Zip program is being marketed by people who can't spell.

Cheers,
Jody
I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a ... "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

If he wants to make the distinction between something that's been zipped up and a file that's been compressed with WinZip, he should say winzip'ed, at least. But I don't see what's wrong with 'zipped.' It's not like you could confuse the two things and end up with something totally different from what you wanted.
Luca, imho
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I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a ... "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

"a zipped file" 21,600
"a zip'ed file" 28 Ratio 771:1
By the way,
"a zip file" 326,000

Best Donna Richoux
Alex Bod filted:
I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a ... "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

I can see your friend's point; since "zip" has something of the character of a proper name, it doesn't get inflected the same way a regular word does...you don't refer collectively to Mr Berry, his wife, and his four kids as "the Berries" but rather as "the Berrys"....
My own preference for the case you describe would be "a zip'd file"...it preserves the original form of the trade name but still reflects the way it's pronounced...the people who market the program would probably have you say "a file created with the WinZip™ data compression program", but normal people don't talk like that....r
"a zipped file" 21,600 "a zip'ed file" 28 Ratio 771:1

The latter hits also include "zip-ed", "ZIP-ed", and "ZIP'ed". Is zip in this sense actually an acronym? Acronymfinder.com says it's merely the file extension used by the PKzip program, so there's no reason to capitalize it. If it were a capitalized acronym the apostrophe might make more sense.
By the way, "a zip file" 326,000

A zip file can contain many files, each of which is zipped, so it's not necessarily the same thing as a zipped file. I suspect it's usually what's meant, though.

Ray Heindl
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Alex Bod filted:

I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. ... universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

I can see your friend's point; since "zip" has something of the characterof a proper name, it doesn't get inflected ... program would probably have you say"a file created with the WinZip™ data compression program", but normal peopledon't talk like that....r

I guess the world will little care what any of us think, but if I were being careful with words I would describe the file as a "compressed archive", since files archived with the WinZip-type compression algorithm can be
handled by programs other than WinZip. And in fact, most WinZip-type compression programs use the term "archive" in their own user-assistance material.
In casual conversation with fellow computer users, however, I would just say "zipped". Unless is was
RARed, that is.

Michael West
I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. He assures me that an archive file created with a ... "zipped"? He says he came across a "zip'ed file" at universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?

Heck, I always write ZIPped.
Annoying, isn't it? Emotion: smile

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I have a little disagreement with a friend of mine. ... universities' websites many times. What do you think about this?(snip)

Rather than preserving or drawing attention to the brand name, this frankenbastard of a term creates the impression that the Zip program is being marketed by people who can't spell.

Zip is a public domain protocol, not a brand name. The company responsible for the protocol is PKZip, not WinZip as many now think. Many pieces of software can unzip or zip.
A bigger issue is that of verbing nouns. The real verb should be compress or archive, and zip is the format. If I FTP something, what do I say in the future to tell somebody that it happened? Should I merely say that I transferred (or uploaded or downloaded) a file using FTP? With zip, it's easier because a verb already existed.
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