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Hi Every one, I have this basic confusion in this two sentences, where were you ? where are you? I freaquently get confuse on these sentences, where to use and stuff like that.. cheers prasad
 
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From Devil May Cry (a video game). Two millenniums ago, there was a war between the human world and the other, the underworld. But somebody from the underworld woke up to justice and stood up against this legion alone. Doesn't it sounds a bit awkward? The point is that he believed in justice, right? But justice doesn't seem to be a right word. And what do you think about 'this legion' . is it OK? Because I don't like it either. Hope I'm wrong.
 
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In the Europe Champions League Cup two teams are in the final game. The turbines are full of football lovers. Two teams starts the game and they are holding a football match. The match ends and one team become champion. The members of the winning team comes to take the cup in front of the turbines. Example: "Crowd acclaimed the winning team." I created a short story for the example. When you are not busy would you like to correct some mistakes in the story and would you like to explain how "crowd can acclaim" the winning team? Does acclaim mean here "To shout and clap hands for praising the winning team" ? Thank you.
 
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Hi, 1. When you go to a concert, observe (the) other concertgoers. 2. At the party he looked around. (The) other guests were drinking or socializing. From the point of view of correct grammar, is it "other" or "the other"? I was told that "the" means all/those who were there, zero article is less specific (some who were there). Is that right?
 
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"Bill's theory about UFOs is downright implausible." Above is the original? Which of the following is correct, idiomatic and in the same meaning as the original? 1) Bill's theory about UFOs is completely implausible. 2) Bill's theory about UFOs is absolutely implausible. 3) Bill's theory about UFOs is thoroughly implausible. Thank you.
 
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Hello, When someone replies, with smth like, "I'm a violent person, bah! How did you come up with that?" How do you call that the man did, taunted, jibed, jeered, or what? The case when the matter is found as absurd, and / or ridiculous, but not used to insult someone, only to remark that it's absurd. What word could be used to call that? Thanks!
 
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Which is correct? Do I have to pay shipping costs? Do I have to pay for shipping costs? Do I have to pay shipping? Do I have to pay for shipping? Thanks
 
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Which is correct? What is the difference in/between booking online vs there? Thank you
 
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Is this correct ? I know she had a hard time getting pregnant so I hope her pregnancy is has gone well. Thanks
 
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Is this OK: It's that time of the year again! My itinerary for this spring. Another chance to reflect on the past year, relive the happiness of traveling, and feel the wonderment of revitalization.
 
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"The Senate approved a plan for federal funding of local housing programs." I cannot understand some parts of the above sentence. Would you like to explain them? What does "federal funding" simply mean? What does "local housing" simply mean? Thank you.
 
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Are there any examples in English grammar where "Nor" might come before "Neither"?
 
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"let me reach into the air and pluck out the number 13" do you know what does this sentence mean?
 
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Potato, beet and baby jack fruit curries mixed with spices & condiments are regular buddies, along with the occasional visit by green leaves such as gotukola or mukunuwanna; thus creating a fellowship intent on nourishing, spicing up and titillating us.
 
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All doctors of the department do not only work with patients, but also teach for students the basics of Otolaryngology at the University. Scientific practice and teaching experience allow our experts to keep abreast of the latest news in their field, and provide an excellent opportunity to develop their own unique methods.
 
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Hi there, I would like to confirm that I learned this correctly during my English class. Let's say I am helping someone who wants me to fetch some magazines in a place where there are books. I can't find any magazines. I tell the person: #1 "All I see is books!" #2 "All I see is the books!" If I understood my teacher correctly: either is correct, but used to get the books nearer or further to the speaker. #1 means I see books in front of me (What do I see? I see books) #2 means I see the books that you know and expect to be there (What do I see? The books that you know are there) Did I understand that correctly?
 
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The sentence (from the audio of on old movie released in 1948) is: "That song never went away. It stayed like songs do sometimes for no reason and set through it all." Does " set through it all" mean that the melody of the song became permanent or fixed in his mind for a long time? Does it have another meaning in this context?...
 
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Hi Everyone, I just found this sentence, which was written by a company that I used to work for many moons ago. Looking at it now, I think it's problematic. Does anyone see anything wrong with the following sentence? ' The company has revised the updates as soon as they became available. ' Thanks CC
 
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Does "with the realisation that" mean "where one understands that"? The latter notion may simply be referring to the need for graffiti to remain a street art at all costs, taking place wherever it may locate ‘canvases’ adequate to its purposes, thereby asserting some form of right to the freedom of expression in public spaces.Where things get complicated is with the realisation that the central prerequisite of fulfilling ‘radical potential’ is in fact utterly bound up with transgressions of law, this almost always being the case....
 
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Somebody asks me: 'Did you hear the thunder last night?' 'Yes,' I say, 'When I first heard rumbling, I thought it was an explosion!' or 'When I first heard the rumbling, I thought it was an explosion!' Rumbling or the rumbling? 'The rumbling' appears correct, it's the rumbling from the thunder. But no article I also think is fine. It's like I am saying 'When I first heard some rumbling . . .' Does this make sense?