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I've got a grammar exercise, in which I'm to make up situations for the following sentence: What would it mean? I've got only one idea so far that something has changed and the person won't call any more, at least from London. Like he or she has left London or (and) arrived to the place where the speaker is, or maybe the speaker has arrived to London. Am I right with my version? Which other situations may be?...
 
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I live in New Zealand and I occasionally hear people responding to apology, saying "You are alright". This phrase is used in situations where grace and deep apology is not required such as when your bag accidentally hit someone on a bus. I have been considering that phrase to be slightly rude and shows the speaker's intention of looking down on the apologizer. I would like to know if the definition of that phrase/ your perception towards that phrase. Also is that a polite phrase?
 
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Which of the two following is correct? You chose exactly the same wallpaper as *us*. OR You chose exactly the same wallpaper as we did . Thanks.
 
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5th semester i got supply in one paper. but 7th semester i clear my supply. but 6 th semester result CGPA not updated that's why i'm latter to register to correction my result
 
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To be honest, I find all of these correct: 1) I was walking in the park when I heard a scream. 2) When I heard a scream I was walking in the park. 3) When I was walking in the park I heard a scream. 4) While I was walking..., I heard a scream. 5) I heard a scream while I was walking... 6) As I was walking ... I heard a scream. 7) I heard a scream as I wss walking...
 
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The narrator recalls his adolescence. He came to the local lawyer, Mr. Wickfield' house, which he boarded at as he went to a school, after a long time. Mr. Wickfield's only daughter Agnes is his best friend and counselor. Mr. Wickfield's partner Uriah Heep, who is crazy for Agnes, and his mother live with Mr. Wickfiled in Mr. Wickfiled's. Now Uriah Heep is trying to have Mr. Wickfield drunk on wine. .................... 'We seldom see our present visitor, sir,' he said, addressing Mr. Wickfield , sitting, such a contrast to him , at the end of the table, 'and I should propose to give him welcome in another glass or two of wine, if you have no objections. Mr. Copperfield, your elth and appiness!' I was obliged to make a show of taking the hand he stretched across to me; and then, with very different emotions, I took the hand of the broken gentleman, his partner. 'Come, fellow-partner,' said Uriah, 'if I may take the liberty, - now, suppose you give us something or another appropriate to Copperfield!' I pass over Mr. Wickfield's proposing my aunt, his proposing Mr. Dick, his proposing Doctors' Commons, his proposing Uriah, his drinking everything twice; his consciousness of his own weakness, the ineffectual effort that he made against it; the struggle between his shame in Uriah's deportment, and his desire to conciliate him; the manifest exultation with which Uriah twisted and turned, and held him up before me. It made me sick at heart to see, and my hand recoils from writing it. [David Copperfield by Charles Dickens] 1. I'd like to know if "such a contrast to him" is in apposition to "Mr. Wickfield." 2. I'd like to know what "make a show of taking the hand." 3. I'd like to know if the clause in blue the author directly says to the readers. Thank you in advance for your help....
 
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Hi, could someone please help me phrase this right? Im not sure which one is correct/better. I want to use it for a headline for a flyer There's no limit to/in technology There are no limits in technology Technology has/have no limits Thanks a lot!
 
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Hello, Can someone PLEASE explain to me the rule behind this? The deal will be beneficial for shareholders . The army will get new technology, which should lift soldiers ' morale. The CEO said the new incentive will make employees happy. The principal claimed that the new rule will make students more disciplined. In all of the above examples, there is no definite article before the nouns. Yet it's clear that a specific group of shareholders, soldiers, employees, and students is referred to. It's the shareholders of the company doing the deal, the students of the principal's school. etc.  Why then is it incorrect to say (as I was told that it was here [link]) "I was impressed by the courage of soldiers". If I also want to keep it non-specific? Some/many/any soldiers in that combat unit.  There has to be a rule! Can someone please explain this?...
 
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"Thank you for letting me visit your combat unit. I was impressed by the courage of soldiers ." Is it okay to not use "the" before soldiers if I want to say some soldiers but not all? And thank you. Yours, Raji
 
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1) my view of life 2) my outlook on life
 
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Do you get different impressions when I say, 1) I want to tell people living abroad about my culture. 2) I want to people from abroad about my culture.
 
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Hi! Is the following table Customer Phone number J. Smith 29012000 S. Johnson 39904566 correct or should the headings be Customers and Phone numbers? Thanks!
 
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Who can tell me the difference between structural grammar and TG grammar?
 
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Hi Everyone, I know that 'at the morning' is wrong, and I know all the correct alternatives, so I don't need any examples. I just want to know if there is a [dare I say ] a logical reason why we don't say - at the morning, but we DO say - at night. Many thanks Miss busy as a preposition. ...
 
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The man was the sacristan of the Catholic Clemenskerk in the town. What is the meaning of sacristan?
 
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1. Does " graffiti-busting chemical" mean "the chemicals which does not allow graffiti paint to sit on the wall" or "the chemical that is used to remove the graffiti existing on the walls"? 2. What are "Hitler’s model companies"? I have not ever heard of them. 3. What does the yellow highlighted sentence mean? one of the most poignant ironies of the new site was the discovery, at a very late stage in its construction, that the graffiti-busting chemical being used to treat the stelae had been produced by one of Hitler’s ‘model companies’ Degussa . My point is not that this kind of controversial ‘overlaying’ of the site is ‘all fine’ – as ‘fine’ as the graffiti would have been that might have adorned the stelae had they not been treated – that things change and we have to move on. Instead it is that such occurrences are indicative of and instructive about the Germany of today, and this includes the public response of being outraged by such scandals. In other words, they reveal, in this particular case, that such ex-Nazi companies were not disbanded, that they are indeed still very much alive and well, not exactly run by Nazis...
 
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Can some one share some website that could help to learn th basic rules of english like this link has very good details .. [link] I want to start from the start so please
 
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Hi, hope you guys can help....I work in primary school and we were looking at subordinate clauses. One of the kids asked whether, if we replaced the conjunction with a semi-colon it would still be a main clause and subordinate clause or two equal clause. He shut the window as night fell OR As night fell, he shut the window becomes, He shut the window: night fell OR Night fell; he shut the window. Or does this only work with co-ordinating conjuctions which connect main clauses anyway?
 
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Can anyone please justify the usage of "Past Indefinite" instead of Simple Past? What I know is that it is rather a simple present perfect which refers to an indefinite time in contrast to a simple past which suggests definite (though sometimes unstated), i.e. 'buried in the past', time.
 
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Hi A lot of people use kindly in the meaning of please. Does the use sound OK to native ears? Kindly open the door. Kindly respond quickly. Thanks, Tom...