Vocabulary

Who Brought You Up: Meaning and Use

The English language lets you ask identical questions in different ways, such as the idioms “Who brought up?”...

Matthew Hamel Written by Matthew Hamel · 2 min read >
who brought you up

The English language lets you ask identical questions in different ways, such as the idioms “Who brought [person] up?” and “Who did bring you up?” Speak the English language better by knowing when to use these idioms. Say “Who brought [person] up?” to get a subject word answer, and say “Who did bring you up?” to get an object word answer. The dictionary explains that object questions need auxiliary verbs such as “did” (source).

There are different ways to using these idioms in questions. Follow grammar and dictionary rules that may apply when making “wh” questions in the English language and use helping verbs (source). See examples below for a full understanding of using “bring someone up” idioms properly when speaking and writing something in English.

What is the meaning of who brought [person] up?

Bring someone up has more than one definition in a dictionary. Generally, you ask something like this to get a subject word answer. Use the “brought you up” format when you see something like the following situations:

1. (idioms phrase) when you want to know who updated someone with information on something . Check this dialogue we share below:

Matthew: Who brought John up to date on our present problem regarding accessing the browser link?

John: Mark did. At present, I’m on the same page as everybody else regarding the browser link problem.

2. (idioms phrase)when you like to know who was responsible for the upbringing of someone. See this related dialogue for clarity:

Matthew: His parents died when he was young. So who brought John up as a child?

John: My aunt did, and we’re on the same page about everything.

3. (idioms phrase) when you want to know who accused someone of a crime. (source). Check this dialogue of words we share below:

Matthew: Who brought John up on charges of article plagiarism at the Google office place?

John: No one did. The article plagiarism charge was something of an April Fool’s prank by someone here.

4. (idioms phrase) when you want to know who started a discussion about someone. See this related dialogue for clarity:

Matthew: Who brought John up on the matter of unauthorized entry to Farma, Inc laboratory?

John: Mark did. He said I can’t come to Farma, Inc laboratory for any reason.

5. when you want to know who took someone to a higher location. Check this dialogue of words we share below:

Mark: The sign says, “No entry.” Who brought John up to this private floor?

John: Well, no one. Matthew said I am free to visit and walk around the site to check something out.

Who did bring you up?”

You ask something similar to this when you want an object word answer. Basing on the related examples in the previous section, here are alternative ways to ask idioms such as “Who did bring you up?” to name people in conversations.

Example 1

Matthew: Who did bring you up to date on our full problem with accessing the browser link?

John: The one who brought me up to date on the problem was Mark. I’m on the same page as everybody else regarding the link problem.

Example 2

Matthew: Your parents died when you were young. So who did bring you up as a child?

John: The one who brought me up as a child was my aunt. She was free to take me in when my parents died.

Example 3

Matthew: Who did bring you up on charges of copyright infringement at the Google office place?

John: No one did. The person who brought me up on charges of copyright infringement was no one.

Example 4

Matthew: Who did bring you up on the matter of unauthorized entry to Farma, Inc laboratory?

John: The one who brought me up on the matter of unauthorized visit to the laboratory was Mark.

Example 5

Mark: The sign says, “No entry.” Who did bring you up to this private floor?

John: The person who brought me up here was no one. Matthew said I’m free to visit and walk around the site.

Final thoughts

Make questions depending on the word answers you need. In “bring someone up” examples given above, the first way used subject words for answers while the second way used object words for answers. Read other examples from a reliable dictionary for more help.

Knowing which form of words to follow when asking something would be puzzling at first. Follow the two rules and check the dictionary. Then you would correctly apply these idioms in making a related sentence in the English language.

Written by Matthew Hamel
Matt has spent over a decade in international and ESL education both as a teacher and instructional designer. In addition to classroom and online teaching experience, Matt has written hundreds of lessons and articles about English with an emphasis on ESL learners. Profile
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