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Why Do Students Choose to Study Business Disciplines in 2021?

Today, MBA is one of the most highly-demanded degrees. Business- and computer-oriented students strive to enroll in the top...

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Today, MBA is one of the most highly-demanded degrees. Business- and computer-oriented students strive to enroll in the top schools that teach management and other related disciplines, such as Wharton, Harvard Business School, and The University of Sheffield. You can learn more about the history of business education to understand its importance.

Subjects and Skills That You Can Master by Studying MBA

Statistics or computer science likely come to mind when hearing about MBA, but those are rather narrow fields. The rest of the essential topics that you cover during your business education impact various aspects in life. The significant skills and subjects that MBA provides include:

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Audit
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Investment
  • Project management

One of the most underrated subjects covered is human resources management, which teaches how to supervise and lead people. It is not a secret that HRMs make most of the companies’ critical decisions, as they are responsible for the most valuable asset – personnel. Knowing how to control the staff will help you in any life situation.

You may get enrolled in online business courses—for example, the art of SEO or front-end development. Students can also learn how to become professional writers by mastering copywriting.

Accounting & Audit Not to Fall Short

Because of poor financial management, many families are limited in their purchasing power parity.

Confused about what this means? Then, you should definitely study accounting and related subjects, such as audit and finance. Financial concepts may also scare one from launching a company, causing regrets later on. Because of this, knowledge of accounting and audit will arm you with the tools and skills needed for a successful business start.

Leadership to Unlock the Entrepreneur Inside

Becoming a leader in high school is not the same as conquering a specific market. The competition is rather harsh, no matter which industry you choose. Most students dream about launching their own companies because of the many perks, but being a good boss is also about being a true leader, which involves both creativity and a powerful execution strategy. Various business programs provide students with an opportunity to test launch ideas and try management skills. You can even build your own team of future colleagues in class.

Investment & Finance, or What Makes the World Go Round

Let’s say you or your family members plan a large purchase, but you don’t have enough money. How would you know which company is safe enough to make loans with? The art of investment and finances will show you how to detect secure deals and avoid suspicious ones. Also, you will discover how to operate stocks and bonds, growing your profits. Also, studying MBA will help you understand which factors determine the increase in demand for the stock & bond market, allowing you to make price predictions. You will find out how to evaluate the financial health of a company. Finally, you will learn how to achieve a high return on investment (RoI).

Marketing to Target the Audience Properly

First and foremost, business education involves the art of marketing, a critical skill that allows an individual or company to survive and compete in many life aspects. From the best way to “sell yourself” (meaning to find a well-paid, prestigious job) to targeting your customers to create a proper product, proper marketing can help you remain well-off financially. Nowadays, many businesses struggle to develop a product or service that creates high demand. Helping businesses overcome this hurdle, marketing teaches you how to appeal to your clients.

 

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