At 18, he is a CTO of his tech venture and aiming for Asias 30 under 30

Dalton Prescott Ng, a Singaporean teenager aged 18 years, is already running his own tech venture, where he works as the chief technology officer (CTO).

However, this is not his brush with the technology or starting companies. At 14 years, Dalton founded a company after learning to code at 11 and gained some experience on how to open a company. The idea of the company came when he was playing Minecraft and started automating the game.

Starting a tech venture

He described the experience at 14 years old as overwhelming, and although the company finally failed to take off, he took with him valuable lessons that he is now employing at his newfound tech venture at only 18 years.

Dalton narrated his growing up as a humble setup, where he had to share an old laptop with five others who also depended on it. However, that did not bother him, and in his free time, he would go to the library and borrow Java programming books, which he would use to learn how to code, which gave him a boost and a start of what he is doing right now.

He was also responsible for another venture called MasterApp that dealt with helping people with cognitive learning issues to navigate their educaiton smoothly.

However, it is his latest tech venture that has caught the eyes of a lot of investors. His current tech venture, called OohSpots, helps users like small businesses conveniently buy out-of-home advertising spots.

This has been a journey for him, as he described it, and indicated that, when he first told his mother, at 14 that he was founding a company, she thought the idea was crazy, but nonetheless supported him. Now at 18 and still living at his parent’s home, Dalton said he appreciated all the support he had gotten from the parents.

Dalton also challenged the notion of living large for tech people like him. He said that was not true and what he did involved hours of focused coding, which sometimes would involve working for more than 10 hours a day trying to solve something and hoped that one day he would get in the Forbes Asia’s 30 under 30 for his venture.

Dalton gave advice to other upcoming developers to not make their first priority monetary. He argued that tech ventures should first try to solve a problem that exists in the real world. Only after that should a price be determined about the technology.

 

Featured image by Pixabay