Demand on Funding to Support Children With Special Educational Needs

Families in London have taken the subject of supporting special education to court. 

It looks like it’ll be a battle between the lawyers of the families, who will be arguing that the government neglects the special needs education essentials and the judges who will have to decide whether to send the funding and let the government rethink or proceed with the current policy.

Parents of children who need special needs have made a series of emotional requests outside of the Royal Courts of Justice in London. They protest the policy because it takes away lives and hopes of young people with disabilities.

And that’s not all

The case tells about Lorraine Heugh, mother of Nico Heugh Simone, a 15-year-old boy with autism, anxiety and related disorders. Lorraine said that she had enough, and could no longer stand by and watch how her child and other kids were overlooked and neglected.

“This is about children’s human rights, which are being taken away – and something has to change,” said Lorraine. 

Lorraine was joined by Mary Riddell, mother of nine-year-old Dakota with cerebral palsy. She told a tear-shedding story about how she and her daughter had to fight for her rights and miserably small pieces of support.

Five years ago, these ladies were hopeful for better changes. Today they are protesting and going against the government. What happened through these five years that drove them to such measures?

2014 was the year were significant changes came along and swept aside the previous system concerning the education and health care plans of those with special needs. 

These changes set out the needs of children with the most critical or complicated special needs and disabilities. At first, there was a legal right to support the children of special needs up to the age of 25 (which was 18 before that). 

The changes meant that more young people would be able to go to college or a university independently. But it also massively expanded the bill of councils that had legal duty to match the changes. 

The schools are complaining about the fact that school budgets are used to cover the gaps in special needs funding. And the council is under the question. Did they manage to fund the reforms they introduced adequately?

Following the protests, The Department for Education officials announced: “The government’s ambition for children with special educational needs and disabilities is no different to any other child – we want them to enjoy school and achieve to their full potential.”

They also added that that was the reason why they were investing funding into supporting special education but didn’t proceed on commenting more about the matter without the judicial process.